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Clintonville introduces Adopt a Park program

Sat, 09/03/2016 - 7:17am
By: 

Grace Kirchner, Leader Correspondent

Local organizations, businesses and individuals are invited to adopt a park in Clintonville.

Mayor Lois Bressette said the purpose of the Adopt a Park program is to help preserve, beautify and protect the city parks through community partnerships.

Bressette told the park and recreation committee Tuesday that there are people in the city eager to join the program.

“People are interested now,” she said. “We can’t wait till the snow starts flying, or they won’t do it.”

The city would like participating groups to make a commitment to adopt a park for at least one year.

The parks range in size from 27 acres to as little as a half acre.

Parks that are available for adoption are W.A. Olen Park, Bucholtz Park, Seven Maples Nature Area, Pigeon Lake wayside, Pickerel Point Memorial Park/Picnic Point, Fairway Lake neighborhood playground, Olen neighborhood playground, Rohrer Park, Pigeon River walkway, Veterans Memorial site, Shore Drive neighborhood playground, Gordy Noren Memorial Park, icehouse landing/boat launch facility, Hillside Drive Park, and Pickerel Point and neighborhood playground.

Maintenance efforts could include picking up litter, removing graffiti, doing small-scale gardening and landscaping, sweeping walkways, planting trees, painting and making small-scale projects.

The parks and recreation department will provide garbage bag lines, tools such as hoes, brooms, shovels and rakes, paint and paint brushes, and vinyl gloves.

Incentives and rewards will be provided for program participants.

Applications are available at City Hall, 50 10th St. For information, call Justin McAuly, parks and recreation director, at 715-250-0216.

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Shawano County Fair Schedule

Fri, 09/02/2016 - 7:33am

Friday, Sept. 2

Events

9 a.m.: Open and junior rabbit show, Small Animal Building; open and junior sheep show and pee wee showmanship class, Coliseum; open and junior dairy and meat goat show, Coliseum

11 a.m. to 8 p.m.: Classic car show, Crawford Center

3 p.m.: Horse trail class, horse barns; open and junior class exotic domestic animal show, Coliseum

5 p.m.: Decorated cake auction

6:30 p.m.: Market animal auction of beef, swine and sheep

Entertainment

1-5 p.m.: Roger’s Polka Party, President’s Park

7 p.m.: Shawano Speedway Enduro Race, Grandstand

7-11 p.m.: Chad Przybylski, President’s Park

7:30 p.m.: Led West, under the Grandstand

Activities

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5-10 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Saturday, Sept. 3

Events

9 a.m.: Junior class dairy cattle show, Coliseum; open class horse show, including junior dressage and jumping competitions, Crawford Center; open and junior poultry and poultry products show, Small Animal Building

11 a.m.-8 p.m.: Classic car show, Crawford Center

Entertainment

1-4 p.m.: Polka Dynamics, President’s Park

2 and 4 p.m.: Magic Matt’s Family Fun Show, Junior Building Stage

6 p.m.: Stock Car Races Championship Night, Grandstand

8:30 p.m.: Adam Trask Band, under the grandstand; Neal Zunker, President’s Park

Activities

11 a.m.: Kiddie tractor pull, noon start

12-11 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides; $1.50 per ride from noon to 5 p.m.

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Sunday, Sept. 4

Events

9 a.m.: Gates open; open class dairy show, Coliseum; junior class horse show, Crawford Center

10 a.m.: Protestant church service, under the grandstand

11 a.m.: Polka Mass, President’s Park

11 a.m.-8 p.m.: Classic Car Show, Crawford Center

Noon: Dairy Pee Wee showmanship class, Coliseum

Entertainment

1 p.m.: Tag Races, Trailer Races and Spectator Eliminators, Grandstand

1-5 p.m.: Jerry Voelker, President’s Park

2, 4:30 and 6:30 p.m.: Magic Matt’s Family Fun Show, Junior Building Stage

7-10 p.m.: TNT Polka, President’s Park

8:30 p.m.: Johnny Wad, under the grandstand

Activities

12-11 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Monday, Sept. 5

Events

9 a.m.: Gates open; rooster crowing contests followed by a chicken flying contest and human crowing contest, Coliseum

10 a.m.: Poultry, rabbit and goat auction, Coliseum

11 a.m. to 8 p.m.: Classic car show, Crawford Center

Entertainment

10:30 a.m.: 4-H drill team performance, Crawford Center

11 a.m.: Fun day horse games, Crawford Center

12 and 1:30 p.m.: Magic Matt’s Family Fun Show, Junior Building Stage

1 p.m.: Demolition derby, Grandstand

1-4 p.m.: Alvin Styczynski, President’s Park

Activities

12-6 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

1-3 p.m.: FFA Olympics, Coliseum

5 p.m. Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

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Choose to Move is about having fun for a good cause

Fri, 09/02/2016 - 7:31am
Participation down, but spirits upBy: 

Brady Van Deurzen, [email protected]


Leader Photo by Greg Mellis Lily Guenther, 10, runs alongside her father, Joe Guenther, in the second annual Choose to Move 5K run/walk Thursday at the Shawano County Fair. Guenther was the first female to finish, with a time of 23 minutes, 12 seconds.

The second annual Choose to Move 5K run/walk sponsored by the Rural Health Initiate went off without a hitch Thursday night at the Shawano County Fairgrounds.

Although the number of participants dropped from 92 last year to 41 this year, Rhonda Strebel, RHI executive director, said the event was a success.

“This event is all about being an inclusive, fun 5K run/walk,” Strebel said. “If the runners or walkers had a fun time, then we succeeded.”

Flo Withers, 84, said she enjoyed spending time walking with friends.

“Just to be able to walk around with people is so much fun,” Withers said. “I’d hate to walk all by myself, and here, I don’t have to, I have a nice crowd with me.”

Robyn Shingler, of Shawano, volunteered to help at the event for a second time.

“The Rural Health Initiative is a wonderful cause and I think that it’s something that will catch fire,” Shingler said. “I think that it’s doing a beautiful job an reminding people of the cool amenities that the area has. Helping this initiative is a no-brainer and I wish I could do more to help.”

Being a runner, Shingler considered competing rather than working.

“I would have loved to run in this, but I run all the time, and this is such a great cause that I wanted to help instead,” she said.

Bruce Scheller, of Manawa, posted the event’s best time (19 minutes, 56 seconds).

“I’m a dairy farmer myself, and being that this run was hosted by the Rural Health Initiative, I mean why not?” he said.

Strebel said RHI values its partnership with the fair.

“They have been very supportive of us and have really helped make this work,” she said. “They have provided us with a lot of supplies to allow us to do all of this, and they have just been great partners, and they understand our tie to agricultural too and that we want to support our local farmers.”

The run/walk raised about $1,700 for RHI.

Rural Health Initiative Inc. describes itself as a nonprofit program focused on the growing concerns and barriers related to the health and safety of today’s farm families. Health coordinators make free -in-home visits to farmer and agribusinesses to provide health screenings, offer health coaching, and refer clients to community resources.

Choose to Move

Results

12 and under: 1. Lily Guenther 23:12, 2. Josiah Kuehl 25:08

13-19: 1. Bethany Krewlow 25:14, 2. Allison Stewart 33:08

20-29: 1. Andrea Michonski 46:38, 2. Brianna Olson 46:38

30-39: 1. Liz Conradt 24:32, 2. Julie Relhofer 24:52

40-49: 1. Joe Guenther 23:12, 2. Jeff Ballwahn 33:08

50-59: 1. Bruce Scheller 19:56, 2. Bryan Gagnow 24:03

60 and over: 1. Mary Ann Liefke 40:43, 2. Bonnie Olson 46:38

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Approval of Airbnb will be reconsidered

Fri, 09/02/2016 - 7:28am
Conditional use permit restriction not allowedBy: 

Tim Ryan, [email protected]

A bed-and-breakfast business model gaining popularity across the country but new to the city of Shawano was recommended for approval by the plan commission Wednesday, but it turns out the recommendation will have to go back for reconsideration next month.

Assistant City Administrator Eddie Sheppard said a new public hearing will have to be held on a request for a conditional use permit to allow an Airbnb at a residence at 420 River Heights.

Airbnb is an online marketplace that enables people to list, fin, and then rent vacation space for a processing fee. The privately owned and operated company was founded in August 2008 and is headquartered in San Francisco.

The Airbnb marketplace connects hosts and travelers via its website.

Though referred to as a bed-and-breakfast, there’s actually no breakfast involved. Many of the bookings involve out-of-towners needing a place to spend the night.

James and Deborah Lonick had been running an Airbnb at their home on River Heights for several months before learning the operation required a conditional use permit.

Several of the Lonicks’ neighbors, however, told the commission they were opposed to a business operation in their residential district.

A chief concern was not so much with the Lonicks, but a conditional use permit attached to the property that could be passed down to new owners in the future.

Sheppard said Thursday he gave the plan commission incorrect information when he said commissioners could attach a condition to the permit that would restrict it to the Lonicks.

He said he since learned that such a condition would be in conflict with the city’s ordinance and would not be allowed.

There was no legal counsel at Wednesday’s meeting to address that question.

Sheppard said he couldn’t in good conscience pass the commission’s recommendation on to the Common Council for approval due to the misunderstanding.

Instead, the commission will hold a new public hearing on Oct. 5.

The Lonicks are proposing to make available a small studio apartment overlooking the river, with a maximum occupancy of three people, based on Airbnb guidelines.

Deborah Lonick said she and her husband, who have traveled and stayed in Airbnb’s elsewhere, decided to make their home available after their three children, now adults, moved out.

She said experiences at those accommodations had been wonderful and that the Shawano location would be unique.

“Shawano is a friendly place in the world where the world is a little bit hostile, ” she said. “Ours is a sanctuary, a quiet place.”

She added that parties, pets and children are not allowed.

James Lonick said the Airbnb would draw people who would otherwise not come to Shawano.

“These are people who would not come to Shawano unless it was Airbnb network,” he said. “They’re not going to stay in one of the hotels in town. This is a different kind of person. They’re quiet, nice people.”

Lonick noted that guests are background-checked by Airbnb, just as the Lonicks were to be able to offer the space.

The Lonicks offered their home as an Airbnb site in June and July before being informed by the city that a conditional use permit was required.

They provided the commission with signatures from neighbors who were unopposed to the idea.

However, one of their neighbors, Sam Santacroce, said he was concerned that a business operation in the residential neighborhood could decrease the value of his property.

“I don’t think this is the place for just the third bed-and-breakfast in Shawano,” he said.

The city has issued special exceptions for two other traditional bed-and-breakfast operations, though only one — located at Franklin and Green Bay streets — followed through by operating one.

Several bed-and-breakfasts are in operation outside the city limits in the town of Wescott.

Fred Crook, another neighbor, had good words for the Lonicks, but reservations about the Airbnb.

“I consider the Lonicks an above average neighbor, an above average property,” he said. “I would be happy to let them have the permit. I would have no objection at all because I know they would handle that great, but this passing (the conditional use permit) on to the next person concerns me because we have no idea how that person is going to handle it.”

Plan commission member Robyn Shingler said she has stayed at Airbnb properties and has always had a good experience.

“This is new to Shawano, but it’s certainly not unusual at all to have an Airbnb property today, ” she said. “The fact that we’re taking it up and this is our first experience is what I guess is unusual.”

She said even if the commission denied the request, others would eventually come along.

Shingler said, however, that the potential of transferring the conditional use to new property owners was a concern.

Commission member Chad Kary said the Airbnb represented a new business model that the city should embrace.

“This is the new economy,” he said. “People travel in this way now. We have an opportunity to say we’re friendly to this kind of business.”

Kary said he realized some people don’t like having things in their backyard, but, he said, “I don’t see this as one of those negatives that we necessarily need to keep out of our backyard.”

The recommendation for approval passed on a 6-2 vote, with Tim Schultz and Dick Felts voting against. Both had raised concern about setting a precedent for business operations in residential districts.

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Lake treatment results look positive

Fri, 09/02/2016 - 7:23am
Tests show invasive plant down 90 percentBy: 

Scott Williams, [email protected]

Destructive plants clogging the waters of Shawano Lake are in retreat after large-scale herbicide treatments designed to clear the lake for better boating, fishing and swimming.

Early test results show that chemical applications carried out this summer have reduced by more than 90 percent the lake’s main targeted invasive plant species.

Officials caution that more testing is needed, but they are encouraged by preliminary indications that the herbicide worked even better than anticipated in improving water quality.

“All signs point to a successful treatment,” said Eddie Heath, an ecologist on the project with the consulting firm Onterra LLC.

Water samples collected from the 6,000-acre lake before and after the chemical treatments, Heath said, show that infestation of the invasive plant species known as Eurasian Water Milfoil has been reduced from affecting 17 percent of the lake to slightly more than 1 percent.

Test results also show minimal damage caused by the herbicide to native plant species that lake advocates hope will flourish once the invasive plants are out of the way.

Ray Zuelke, a board member of the group called Shawano Area Waterways Management, said the water is visibly cleaner since the chemical applications, and he believes the lake’s ecological system is healthier than ever.

“It’s incredible,” he said. “I never dreamed we could make it this good.”

Zuelke’s group of lakefront property owners and other lake boosters spearheaded the herbicide program after seeing the Eurasian Water Milfoil and other destructive plants grow so thick and large in Shawano Lake that they could snag motorboats and impede fish populations.

With a permit from the state Department of Natural Resources, the group combined $200,000 in state funds with $235,000 in private donations to conduct the treatments.

Crews from California-based firm Clean Waters Inc. were on the lake May 23 and May 24 to apply a herbicide known as DMA 4, using long hoses to send the chemical deep underwater where the targeted plants had taken root. The goal was to complete a large-scale application covering virtually the entire lake, but to do so without harming native plants or wildlife species.

Brenda Nordin, a lake biologist with the Department of Natural Resources, said she credited careful planning by all involved partners with executing the program and achieving the desired results. Nordin said the preliminary reports of 90 percent success or better was very impressive.

“That’s exactly what we like to hear,” she said.

Under state grant standards, a success rate of 75 percent is generally sufficient to judge a state-funded environmental program to be worthwhile.

In addition to the waterways management group, Zuelke said the lake cleanup effort has been supported, financially or otherwise, by local municipalities around the lake, county staff, area businesses and lakefront homeowners. The resulting improvement in water quality, he said, has impressed lake visitors and boosted prospects for increased tourism and economic activity.

“Everything’s very positive,” he said.

Heath said the small areas of Eurasian Water Milfoil that still exist — covering barely 1 percent of the lake — are somewhat concentrated on the lake’s western edge near Shawano Municipal Airport.

Consultants at De Pere-based Onterra will issue a formal report on the preliminary results within a few months. Then they plan to return to Shawano Lake next spring or summer to collect new water samples and look for signs of Eurasian Water Milfoil attempting a comeback.

Heath said nobody is certain yet whether the invasive plant has been eradicated or merely knocked down.

“If it comes back next year with a vengeance,” he said, “we’ll know the answer.”

ONLINE

For information about Shawano Area Waterways Management, go to www.sawm.org.

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Date set for hearing on sewer rate hike

Fri, 09/02/2016 - 7:18am
Utility seeks 12 percent increase in revenueBy: 

Tim Ryan, [email protected]

A date has been set for a public hearing via telephone on Shawano Sewer and Water Utility’s request for an increase in sewer rates.

The utility filed the application with the state Public Service Commission earlier this year.

According to city officials, the increase is necessary due to a 54 percent increase in utility infrastructure expenses and a 20 percent increase in operating expenses since the last full sewer rate case was completed in 2008.

The city has requested an overall increase in annual revenue of $219,140, or an increase of 12 percent over present revenue, though that percentage will vary depending on the type of customer.

According to City Administrator Brian Knapp, the current average sewer charge, based on the city average of 500 cubic feet of water used per month, is $30.37.

A 12 percent increase, if approved by the PSC, will raise the monthly sewer charge by $3.64 to $34.01.

However, Knapp noted, that will vary depending on classes of customers, which are broken into residential, commercial and industrial.

The PSC will determine the actual level of the revenue requirement after reviewing the application and holding the hearing.

If the commission authorizes an increase, it will also authorize the ultimate rates individual classes of customers pay.

The hearing is scheduled for 10 a.m. Sept. 16 in the River Room at Shawano City Hall, 125 S.Sawyer St.

Information regarding the application is also available on the PSCs website, http://psc.wi.gov.

Further questions can be addressed to Eddie Sheppard at 715-526-3512 during office hours, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Scheduling questions regarding the hearing may be directed to the Public Service Commission at 608-266-3768.

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Public Record

Fri, 09/02/2016 - 7:17am

Shawano Police Department

Aug. 31

Police logged 21 incidents, including the following:

Disorderly — A 22-year-old man was arrested for disorderly conduct after police responded to an intoxicated person complaint in the 200 block of East Center Street.

Burglary — A 55-year-old man was arrested for criminal trespass and bail jumping after police responded to a burglary complaint in the 300 block of South Washington Street.

Warrant — A 30-year-old man was taken into custody on a warrant at the probation and parole offices, 1340 E. Green Bay St.

Fraud — Police investigated a fraud complaint at Walmart, 1244 E. Green Bay St.

Shawano County Sheriff’s Department

Aug. 31

Deputies logged 53 incidents, including the following:

OWI — A 24-year-old Kaukauna man was arrested for operating while intoxicated on South High Line and state Highway 47 in the town of Lessor.

OWL/OAS — A 17-year-old Gillett male was cited for operating without a license and operating after suspension after an injury accident on Holy Hill Road in the town of Green Valley.

Vandalism — A truck was reported vandalized on Park Avenue in the town of Waukechon.

Warrant — A 29-year-old woman was arrested on an Oconto County warrant on Holy Hill Road in the town of Green Valley.

Vandalism — Playground equipment was reported damaged on Honeysuckle Lane in Tigerton.

Fraud — Authorities investigated a fraud complaint on Meisner Street in Wittenberg.

Theft — Tools were reported stolen on Main Street in Gresham.

Theft — An iPad was reported stolen on County Road N in the town of Birnamwood.

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Crow tests positive for West Nile

Fri, 09/02/2016 - 7:14am

The Shawano-Menominee Counties Health Department reports a dead crow found in Shawano on Aug. 18 has tested positive for West Nile virus. This is the first bird that tested positive for West Nile virus in Shawano County since surveillance for the mosquito-transmitted virus began May 1.

Several other counties in the state also have reported positive bird tests.

Shawano County has had a positive bird test for each of the last three years. The last positive test from Menominee County was in 2012.

“The positive bird means that residents of Shawano County need to be more vigilant in their personal protective measures to prevent mosquito bites,” said Jaime Bodden, county health officer.

West Nile virus is spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. Mosquitoes acquire the virus by feeding on infected birds.

“Shawano and Menominee counties residents should be aware of West Nile virus and take some simple steps to protect themselves and their families against mosquito bites,” Bodden said. “West Nile virus has been present in our area for several years, so the best way to avoid the disease is to reduce exposure to and eliminate breeding grounds for mosquitoes.”

Most people infected with West Nile virus do not get sick. Those who do become ill usually experience mild symptoms such as fever, headache, muscle ache, rash and fatigue. Less than 1 percent of people infected with the virus get seriously ill with symptoms that include high fever, muscle weakness, stiff neck, disorientation, mental confusion, tremors, confusion, paralysis and coma.

FYI

The Shawano-Menominee Counties Health Department recommends the following actions to eliminate breeding grounds for mosquitoes:

- Properly dispose of items that hold water, such as tin cans, plastic containers, ceramic pots or discarded tires.

- Clean roof gutters and downspouts for proper drainage.

- Turn over wheelbarrows, wading pools, boats, and canoes when not in use.

- Change the water in birdbaths and pet dishes at least every three days.

- Clean and chlorinate swimming pools, outdoor saunas, and hot tubs; drain water from pool covers.

- Trim tall grass, weeds, and vines since mosquitoes use these areas to rest during hot daylight hours.

- Landscape to prevent water from pooling in low-lying areas.

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Shawano County Fair Schedule

Thu, 09/01/2016 - 7:42am

Thursday, Sept. 1

Events

9 a.m.: Gates open; junior class swine show and pee wee showmanship class with open swine show to follow, Coliseum

5 p.m.: Open and junior beef show, Coliseum

6 p.m.: Homemade beer and wine judging, Crawford Center

Entertainment

6 p.m.: Wasted Stay, under the Grandstand

6-10 p.m.: New Generation, President’s Park

Dusk: Fireworks, Grandstand

Activities

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5-10 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

6 p.m.: Choose to Move 5K, Grandstand

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Friday, Sept. 2

Events

9 a.m.: Open and junior rabbit show, Small Animal Building; open and junior sheep show and pee wee showmanship class, Coliseum; open and junior dairy and meat goat show, Coliseum

11 a.m. to 8 p.m.: Classic car show, Crawford Center

3 p.m.: Horse trail class, horse barns; open and junior class exotic domestic animal show, Coliseum

5 p.m.: Decorated cake auction

6:30 p.m.: Market animal auction of beef, swine and sheep

Entertainment

1-5 p.m.: Roger’s Polka Party, President’s Park

7 p.m.: Shawano Speedway Enduro Race, Grandstand

7-11 p.m.: Chad Przybylski, President’s Park

7:30 p.m.: Led West, under the Grandstand

Activities

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5-10 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Saturday, Sept. 3

Events

9 a.m.: Junior class dairy cattle show, Coliseum; open class horse show, including junior dressage and jumping competitions, Crawford Center; open and junior poultry and poultry products show, Small Animal Building

11 a.m.-8 p.m.: Classic car show, Crawford Center

Entertainment

1-4 p.m.: Polka Dynamics, President’s Park

2 and 4 p.m.: Magic Matt’s Family Fun Show, Junior Building Stage

6 p.m.: Stock Car Races Championship Night, Grandstand

8:30 p.m.: Adam Trask Band, under the grandstand; Neal Zunker, President’s Park

Activities

11 a.m.: Kiddie tractor pull, noon start

12-11 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides; $1.50 per ride from noon to 5 p.m.

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Sunday, Sept. 4

Events

9 a.m.: Gates open; open class dairy show, Coliseum; junior class horse show, Crawford Center

10 a.m.: Protestant church service, under the grandstand

11 a.m.: Polka Mass, President’s Park

11 a.m.-8 p.m.: Classic Car Show, Crawford Center

Noon: Dairy Pee Wee showmanship class, Coliseum

Entertainment

1 p.m.: Tag Races, Trailer Races and Spectator Eliminators, Grandstand

1-5 p.m.: Jerry Voelker, President’s Park

2, 4:30 and 6:30 p.m.: Magic Matt’s Family Fun Show, Junior Building Stage

7-10 p.m.: TNT Polka, President’s Park

8:30 p.m.: Johnny Wad, under the grandstand

Activities

12-11 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Monday, Sept. 5

Events

9 a.m.: Gates open; rooster crowing contests followed by a chicken flying contest and human crowing contest, Coliseum

10 a.m.: Poultry, rabbit and goat auction, Coliseum

11 a.m. to 8 p.m.: Classic car show, Crawford Center

Entertainment

10:30 a.m.: 4-H drill team performance, Crawford Center

11 a.m.: Fun day horse games, Crawford Center

12 and 1:30 p.m.: Magic Matt’s Family Fun Show, Junior Building Stage

1 p.m.: Demolition derby, Grandstand

1-4 p.m.: Alvin Styczynski, President’s Park

Activities

12-6 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

1-3 p.m.: FFA Olympics, Coliseum

5 p.m. Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

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Animals arrive at new home

Thu, 09/01/2016 - 7:39am
Living fair exhibits require constant care over 6-day runBy: 

Lee Pulaski, [email protected]


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Hannah Cerveny, 12, of Gresham, checks the water supply for several pigs, including two of hers, at the swine barn Wednesday morning. This is Cerveny’s first time exhibiting animals at the Shawano County Fair.
Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Trucks with animal trailers were lined up Wednesday near the animal barns as exhibitors moved expeditiously to unload their animals.

There will be hundreds of animals on display over the six-day Shawano County Fair, but behind every animal is an owner spending countless hours making sure it is cared for properly.

The fair officially opened Wednesday evening with a ceremony and a few other events, but animal exhibitors were at the fairgrounds bright and early to get their animals into their pens. The colorful displays describing the animals only take a few minutes to set up, but the needs of the animals themselves can be an around-the-clock effort.

Just ask the Breitrick family from Tilleda. Kerry Breitrick said her two daughters, Skye, 13, and Brooke, 17, have six beef steers, three pigs and a dozen rabbits entered in this year’s fair, and there will be very little rest for the girls as they participate in the various animal shows over the next few days.

“My daughters stay here at the Super 8 with their dad so they can get here right away in the morning,” Breitrick said. “They’re feeding them and checking on them throughout the day. We’re pretty much here from before it opens … and then they’re here well after dark, 10:30 or 11 at night.”

The girls, both members of the Tilleda Timberwolves 4-H Club, spent a large portion of their morning washing the steers that will take part in the fair’s beef show, which starts at 5 p.m. Thursday in the Coliseum. Washing the animals can run anywhere from 45 minutes to an hour, depending on how cooperative they are, Breitrick said, and then the day of the show, another 15-20 minutes will be spent blow drying the animals prior to bringing them into the arena.

“You want to do a really good job,” Breitrick said. “You regularly wash them and get them adjusted to the process during the summer. I would say two to three times a week (prior to the fair) they wash them.”

The family brought 200 pounds of grain and nine bales of hay to feed the animals.

“We’re hoping that’ll suffice for the fair,” Breitrick said.

Hannah Cerveny, 12, estimated she would be spending a few hours each day caring for the two pigs she entered in this year’s fair. Cerveny, a member of the Gresham FFA, is exhibiting for the first time.

Cerveny said she was enjoying taking care of not only her pigs but also the ones belonging to friends. She spent part of Wednesday morning checking to make sure the animals had plenty of water.

“You have to make sure they’re cared for,” Cerveny said.

Cerveny said she gives her pigs a type of feed that is 18 percent protein with the rest containing corn. She said each pig consumes at least five to six cups of feed per day.

Although animals were not allowed on-site until the opening day of the fair, Kelli Posbrig, 11, of the Country Korner 4-H Club, was there with her family Tuesday night, cleaning up the area where her animals would be displayed and ensuring plenty of sawdust was on the ground for their comfort.

“I’m here every day,” Posbrig said. “You make sure they’re fed and bedded, and you have to make sure they don’t make a mess. We’re here as much as we can, from the time we get to the fairgrounds to the time we go home.”

Posbrig is entering beef, swine and poultry this year. Although she has entered the fair previously with other animals, it is her first year showing beef.

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Commission backs agreement for microbrewery

Thu, 09/01/2016 - 7:36am
Site is former Crescent theater downtownBy: 

Tim Ryan, [email protected]

The Shawano Plan Commission on Wednesday recommended approval of a developer’s agreement that would turn the former Crescent Pitcher Show at 220 S. Main St. into a microbrewery and pub.

The agreement with Stubborn Brothers Brewery LLC, of Marion, will provide a low-interest loan and a grant to the brewery, with the money coming from one of the city’s Tax Incremental Finance districts.

Brewery representatives weren’t at the meeting, but Dennis Heling, chief economic development officer with Shawano County Economic Progress Inc., said the owners’ intent was to be a brew/pub, have entertainment and create a viewing area where patrons could see the brewing process.

“Obviously, they would probably have some type of food, small types of food, because they’re not looking for people to just come in and drink beer,” Heling said. “Upstairs their goal is to have a banquet hall, a banquet area where they intend to work with local purveyors of food so those can be catered in. It appears that will be part of their business.”

The developer’s agreement calls for the city to provide Stubborn Brothers with a $270,000 10-year loan at a 4 percent interest rate, and a grant of $80,000.

For its part, Stubborn Brothers is expecting to put about $547,000 in remodeling costs into the project.

“That’s a pretty substantial investment in that old building,” said Eddie Sheppard, assistant city administrator. “It’s kind of a good deal for Shawano if you look at it that way.”

It’s expected the building will have an assessed valuation of $500,000, including personal property, once the remodeling and renovation is done. If it falls below that figure, Stubborn Brothers will have to make a payment to the city in lieu of taxes to make up the difference in property tax revenue.

It’s anticipated the remodeling and renovation will be completed by June.

The Shawano Common Council will take up the agreement on Wednesday.

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Mold found in high school classrooms

Thu, 09/01/2016 - 7:35am
Classes relocated on first day of school yearBy: 

Scott Williams, [email protected]

Mold discovered inside Shawano Community High School is displacing students in several classrooms on the first day of the new school year.

Shawano School District Superintendent Gary Cumberland said a problem in the school’s cooling system allowed mold to develop over the summer in about a half-dozen classrooms in the building wing that houses art, music and band.

Cleaning crews removed visible signs of the mold, which was not toxic, but it could take several more days before air-quality tests demonstrate whether the classrooms are safe.

“We’re not going to have any kids in any of the classrooms until we get the all-clear,” Cumberland said.

Students are returning from summer vacation Thursday to begin the 2016-17 school year.

Jaime Bodden, public health director of the Shawano-Menominee Counties Health Department, said mold found in most nonindustrial settings typically is not toxic, although it can cause breathing problems and allergic reactions.

Bodden said her department would assist the school district if needed with the high school problem.

“It sounds like they have a game plan in place,” she said.

Cumberland said displaced classes would be moved temporarily to an auditorium, lecture hall or other facilities in the high school.

The mold problem was uncovered when teachers returned from summer break, the superintendent said. Air-quality tests showed that the affected classrooms had elevated levels of mold in the air.

The district hired SERVPRO of Green Bay to handle the cleanup, and school staffers initially thought they had the issue resolved. Cumberland said he decided to enlist environmental consultants to test the air quality after the cleanup. Those test results could be available by Tuesday.

When officials realized the situation would not be resolved before students returned from summer break on Thursday, the district sent a notice out to parents and issued a statement to the news media.

“The Shawano School District apologizes for the inconvenience,” the statement said, “but wants to be sure that all rooms are fully cleaned prior to having students in them.”

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Clintonville gets grant to study downtown, rec center needs

Thu, 09/01/2016 - 7:34am
Kell: Important for downtown revitalization effortsBy: 

Grace Kirchner, Leader Correspondent

The Wisconsin Department of Administration has awarded a $25,000 Community Development Block Grant to Clintonville to help develop a revitalization plan for a portion of the downtown and an assessment of future uses for the former armory, which is home to the city’s recreation center.

City Administrator Chuck Kell said the funding is an important step in the city’s efforts to identify downtown revitalization strategies along the Pigeon River and to determine how much it would cost to make the rec center, 55 E. 12th St., a focal point for city activities in the downtown area.

Kell said the recreation center project could potentially qualify for a $500,000 construction grant.

“There needs to be a strong definite plan for the use of the building and a community consensus in what should be done with the facility.” he said. “Until now that has not been none.”

The downtown revitalization plan will consider tax-generating commercial uses and residential opportunities for the properties along 11th Street adjacent to the Pigeon River, including redevelopment of the old Merc building and the former bowling alley that is scheduled to be torn down later this year.

Kell says the city might consider a new Tax Incremental Finance district in the downtown, but there first needs to be a clear plan in place.

TIF districts are areas where municipalities invest in infrastructure, such as sewer and water, to attract development where it might not otherwise occur, or to make improvements, such as eliminating blight. Whatever increase in tax revenue that results from development in those districts goes to paying back the debt the municipality incurred from making improvements to the district.

Kell said the city, including residents and the Common Council, needs to develop plans for the downtown. There are buildings that need attention soon, he said, or they will go the way the bowling alley did.

“It is important to apply for another plan for the whole downtown,” he said.

Statewide, the DOA distributed $8.2 million through the block grants program this year to improve and build public facilities and to encourage further planning.

“Our administration is committed to helping local governments upgrade infrastructure vital to the growth of their community,” Secretary Scott Neitzel said. “These funds will help local governments improve our communities to ensure Wisconsin remains a great place to live and to do business.”

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Court News

Thu, 09/01/2016 - 7:28am

Strangulation

A Neopit man is charged with a felony count of strangulation and suffocation for an alleged domestic abuse incident in the Shawano on Saturday.

Darwin L. Thunder, 23, could face a maximum six years in prison and a $10,000 fine if convicted. He is also charged with misdemeanor counts of battery and resisting an officer.

Thunder is accused of trying to smother the woman during the altercation.

He is free on a $1,000 signature bond and scheduled for a preliminary hearing Oct. 13.

Strangulation

A Bowler man is facing a felony charge of strangulation and suffocation as a result of an alleged domestic abuse incident in Tigerton.

Adams T. Davids, 27, could face a maximum six years in prison and a $10,000 fine if convicted. He is also charged with misdemeanor battery.

Davids is accused of choking a woman during an Aug. 17 altercation.

He is free on a $500 cash bond and is due in court for an adjourned initial appearance Tuesday.

Child abuse

A Shawano man has been charged with a felony count of physical abuse of a child with the probability of great bodily harm.

Nicolas Rivera, 21, could face a maximum 12 1/2 years in prison and a $25,000 fine if found guilty. He is also charged with a misdemeanor count of domestic abuse-related disorderly conduct.

He is accused of repeatedly striking a 17-year-old girl during a domestic disturbance in the city Aug. 24.

Rivera is free on a $1,000 signature bond and is due back in court Tuesday for an adjourned initial appearance.

Felony OWI

A Birnamwood man is facing a felony count of operating while intoxicated for his alleged fourth drunken driving offense in the last five years.

Joseph S. Sazama, 54, was arrested Friday in Wittenberg after a sheriff’s deputy who pulled him over on County Road Q for not wearing a seat belt, according to the criminal complaint.

The complaint alleges Sazama had a preliminary breath test showing a blood-alcohol level of 0.163 percent, twice the legal limit.

Sazama is free on a $2,500 signature bond and is due back in court Tuesday for an adjourned initial appearance.

Burglary

A Shawano woman has been charged with a felony count of burglary for allegedly breaking into a room in the city in July and stealing prescription medication.

Amy F. Henning, 45, could face a maximum 12 1/2 years in prison and a $25,000 fine if convicted. She is also charged with a felony count of possessing narcotic drugs, which carries a maximum 3 1/2 years in prison and a $10,000 fine, along with misdemeanor counts of theft, possession of a controlled substance and possessing an illegally obtained prescription.

She is due in court for an initial appearance Sept. 19.

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Public Record

Thu, 09/01/2016 - 7:26am

Shawano Police Department

Aug. 30

Police logged 28 incidents, including the following:

Arrest — A woman was taken into custody at the probation and parole offices, 1340 E. Green Bay St.

Drug Offense — Police investigated a drug complaint in the 200 block of South Andrews Street.

Accident — Police responded to a minor accident in the 1300 block of East Green Bay Street.

Disturbance — Police responded to a domestic disturbance in the 400 block of South Washington Street.

Shawano County Sheriff’s Department

Aug. 30

Deputies logged 37 incidents, including the following:

OAR — A 23-year-old Wausau woman was cited for operating after revocation and arrested on a probation hold on Berry Street in Bowler.

Disorderly — A 44-year-old St. Louis man was arrested for disorderly conduct and criminal damage to property on County Road MM in the town of Richmond.

Clintonville Police Department

Aug. 30

Police logged 14 incidents, including the following:

Theft — Thefts from vehicles were reported on Dodge and Waupaca streets. A vehicle was also reported broken into on Sixth Street.

Theft — A retail theft was reported on South Main Street.

Disturbance — Police responded to a domestic disturbance on Stewart Street.

Disturbance — Police responded to a domestic disturbance on Brix Street.

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Shawano County Fair Schedule

Wed, 08/31/2016 - 7:42am

Wednesday, Aug. 31

Events

5 p.m.: Gates open; junior class dog show and pee wee showmanship class, Crawford Center

6 p.m.: Junior class cat show, Junior Building

Entertainment

6:30 p.m.: Truck and farm tractor pull, Grandstand

Activities

6-10 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

Thursday, Sept. 1

Events

9 a.m.: Gates open; junior class swine show and pee wee showmanship class with open swine show to follow, Coliseum

5 p.m.: Open and junior beef show, Coliseum

6 p.m.: Homemade beer and wine judging, Crawford Center

Entertainment

6 p.m.: Wasted Stay, under the Grandstand

6-10 p.m.: New Generation, President’s Park

Dusk: Fireworks, Grandstand

Activities

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5-10 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

6 p.m.: Choose to Move 5K, Grandstand

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Friday, Sept. 2

Events

9 a.m.: Open and junior rabbit show, Small Animal Building; open and junior sheep show and pee wee showmanship class, Coliseum; open and junior dairy and meat goat show, Coliseum

11 a.m. to 8 p.m.: Classic car show, Crawford Center

3 p.m.: Horse trail class, horse barns; open and junior class exotic domestic animal show, Coliseum

5 p.m.: Decorated cake auction

6:30 p.m.: Market animal auction of beef, swine and sheep

Entertainment

1-5 p.m.: Roger’s Polka Party, President’s Park

7 p.m.: Shawano Speedway Enduro Race, Grandstand

7-11 p.m.: Chad Przybylski, President’s Park

7:30 p.m.: Led West, under the Grandstand

Activities

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5-10 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Saturday, Sept. 3

Events

9 a.m.: Junior class dairy cattle show, Coliseum; open class horse show, including junior dressage and jumping competitions, Crawford Center; open and junior poultry and poultry products show, Small Animal Building

11 a.m.-8 p.m.: Classic car show, Crawford Center

Entertainment

1-4 p.m.: Polka Dynamics, President’s Park

2 and 4 p.m.: Magic Matt’s Family Fun Show, Junior Building Stage

6 p.m.: Stock Car Races Championship Night, Grandstand

8:30 p.m.: Adam Trask Band, under the grandstand; Neal Zunker, President’s Park

Activities

11 a.m.: Kiddie tractor pull, noon start

12-11 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides; $1.50 per ride from noon to 5 p.m.

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Sunday, Sept. 4

Events

9 a.m.: Gates open; open class dairy show, Coliseum; junior class horse show, Crawford Center

10 a.m.: Protestant church service, under the grandstand

11 a.m.: Polka Mass, President’s Park

11 a.m.-8 p.m.: Classic Car Show, Crawford Center

Noon: Dairy Pee Wee showmanship class, Coliseum

Entertainment

1 p.m.: Tag Races, Trailer Races and Spectator Eliminators, Grandstand

1-5 p.m.: Jerry Voelker, President’s Park

2, 4:30 and 6:30 p.m.: Magic Matt’s Family Fun Show, Junior Building Stage

7-10 p.m.: TNT Polka, President’s Park

8:30 p.m.: Johnny Wad, under the grandstand

Activities

12-11 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Monday, Sept. 5

Events

9 a.m.: Gates open; rooster crowing contests followed by a chicken flying contest and human crowing contest, Coliseum

10 a.m.: Poultry, rabbit and goat auction, Coliseum

11 a.m. to 8 p.m.: Classic car show, Crawford Center

Entertainment

10:30 a.m.: 4-H drill team performance, Crawford Center

11 a.m.: Fun day horse games, Crawford Center

12 and 1:30 p.m.: Magic Matt’s Family Fun Show, Junior Building Stage

1 p.m.: Demolition derby, Grandstand

1-4 p.m.: Alvin Styczynski, President’s Park

Activities

12-6 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

1-3 p.m.: FFA Olympics, Coliseum

5 p.m. Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

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Ready for showtime

Wed, 08/31/2016 - 7:40am
Crews transform 40-acre fairgroundsBy: 

Scott Williams, [email protected]


Leader Photo by Scott Williams Bear Erdmann washes the outside of the tent Tuesday for his Nickel Pitch game, as final preparations wind down for the Shawano County Fair.
Leader Photo by Scott Williams Jennifer Bunner arranges the stuffed-animal prizes Tuesday at the Duck Pond game at the Shawano County Fair, which opens Wednesday.

Let the fun begin.

Crew members completed the final preparations Tuesday for the end-of-summer blowout of entertainment and friendly competition that is the Shawano County Fair.

The gates open at 5 p.m. Wednesday to signal the start of the county fair’s six-day exposition on the fairgrounds in Shawano.

“I love the fair,” said Bear Erdmann as he was setting up the colorful tent for his Nickel Pitch game on the midway.

Erdmann’s family has been offering fun games for Shawano County Fair crowds since he was a kid. Sweat dripped from his forehead Tuesday as he talked about how he looks forward each summer to seeing old friends and familiar faces.

“It comes once a year,” he said. “It’s like a big family reunion.”

With just hours until the first spectators arrive on the fairgrounds, vendors and volunteers were busy putting the finishing touches on carnival rides, food stands and other attractions covering the estimated 40-acre fairgrounds.

The Shawano Area Agricultural Society leases the county-owned property and organizes the county fair.

Pat Brusky, a member of the fair board, said getting the fairgrounds ready is a labor of love, from the livestock barns and performance stages to the picnic tables and even the trash barrels.

Brusky, who was using a front-end loader Tuesday to fill a sandbox for kids, said the fairgrounds is transformed in just a few days leading up to the opening ceremonies.

“The pre-fair is always fun,” he said. “It’s a little hectic, and it’s a lot of work, but it’s always fun.”

Final preparations took place Tuesday under sunny hot weather, and fair organizers were excited to hear forecasts for mild temperatures and clear skies in the days ahead.

Joe Kedrowicz, owner of Rainbow Valley Rides Inc., was supervising his crews as they assembled the Ferris wheel, merry-go-round and about 20 others rides on the midway. Everything was going smoothly, Kedrowicz said, and he was looking forward to seeing the crowds.

Shawano County Fair organizers are helpful and cooperative people who share Rainbow Valley’s simple philosophy of working hard and doing a good job, he said.

“You can’t ask for better people,” he said. “You get that down-home sort of feeling here.”

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RDA fields questions on blight plan

Wed, 08/31/2016 - 7:37am
Public hearing still to be scheduledBy: 

Tim Ryan, [email protected]


Leader Photo by Tim Ryan RDA Vice Chairman Dave Kerber, right, answers a resident’s questions during an open house on the RDA’s plan for a recently established blight elimination district Tuesday at City Hall.

Nearly three dozen people turned out Tuesday for an open house on the Shawano Redevelopment Authority’s project plan for addressing blighted properties in a recently established blight elimination district.

The RDA had expected to have a public hearing and approval of its project plan last month before questions and concerns raised by property owners sent the authority back to square one in terms of public outreach.

Tuesday’s open house was aimed at giving residents an opportunity to get their questions answered in one-on-one conversations with RDA officials.

“I hope that’s what’s happening here tonight. That was the goal,” RDA Chair Amanda Sheppard said.

Visitor reviews were mixed, however.

“I was a little disappointed in it,” Mary Bohm said. “I thought it would be a back-and-forth, give-and-take kind of meeting.”

Jim Oberstein said the open house was a good start, but “I wish we could follow up with the opportunity to ask questions back and forth. That’s what I thought tonight was going to be about.”

Judy Oberstein said she had hoped for a roundtable discussion.

“This doesn’t quite make it comfortable enough to sit and really engage in a good conversation when you’re standing like this,” she said.

Sheppard said people would get the opportunity for back-and-forth dialogue at the public hearing.

Other residents said they were pleased with the information they got Tuesday.

“We did get our questions answered and we’re very positive and we’re hoping the city can keep moving forward even though it may be a slow process,” Cindy Van Belkom said.

Sandra King came to the open house with concerns about being in the blight district even though her property is not deemed blighted.

“They assured me now that they’re just going to leave me alone,” she said.

John Baird came to learn whether there were grants or other financial assistance for improvements to his property.

“They’re more for commercial properties, but I’m in a commercial area, so they’re going to let me know if something’s available,” he said. “I would love to do a concrete driveway rather than my bricks, because every 10 or 15 years those bricks break down and they’re blighted, so it’s a never ending battle.”

Baird said she was resigned to being in the district and was taking a wait-and-see approach to how well the district is supervised.

He said property owners should be given plenty of time to make improvements.

“Don’t push. I think that’s a great strategy,” he said.

Mayor Jeanne Cronce said the questions she was hearing Tuesday were similar to those asked at recent Common Council meetings, but with an opportunity for people to get a further explanation and understanding of the RDA’s priorities and objectives.

RDA Vice Chair Dave Kerber said the public hearing would go into more detailed nuts and bolts of the project plan and identify the properties the RDA considers priorities.

“The public hearing is where we will lay out our plan of action,” he said.

The plan will then have to go to the Common Council for approval.

The public hearing date was not been set.

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Sheriff’s deputies now have body cameras

Wed, 08/31/2016 - 7:28am
Stockbridge-Munsee Tribe donated $20KBy: 

Tim Ryan, [email protected]


Contributed Photo Lt. Kurt Kitzman is fitted for his new body camera by a Vievu representative Tuesday at the Shawano County Sheriff’s Department.

Shawano County sheriff’s deputies Tuesday were issued body cameras for the first time, something Sheriff Adam Bieber had pushed for since taking over the department in January 2015.

“This is an important tool for our deputies as it acts as an independent witness,” Bieber said.

He said the cameras would reduce incidents of citizen complaints and complaints of alleged officer “use of force.”

Body camera video can be used in court and used to interview witnesses, suspects, and complainants, which will help officers get a more complete report, Bieber said.

Bieber said the body cams will not change the way deputies do their jobs, but it does add to the equipment they will carry.

“Deputies will need to familiarize themselves with the camera and get into a habit of turning the camera on per policy,” he said.

Deputies were trained in use of the body cams Tuesday.

“Our goal when we started this process was to have the camera’s issued for the Shawano County Fair. We have met our deadline and we are excited to use the cameras,” he said.

Not all deputies are comfortable using the cameras, but, Bieber said, he believes they will get accustomed to them.

“Some feel body cameras are unnecessary. Some may be concerned that administration may use the video to ‘armchair quarterback’ deputies, which is not the case,” he said. “I know that as the deputies get familiar with the cameras they will grow to appreciate them.”

The Stockbridge-Munsee Tribe donated $20,000 to the county to pay the cost of acquiring the body cameras, which will be affixed to deputy uniforms and videotape their movements.

“I want to thank everyone involved in the process of selecting and purchasing the body cameras,” Bieber said.

The department looked at six vendors before choosing the Vievu body cameras.

“They’ve been in the business for quite some time now,” Bieber said.

“Stockbridge-Munsee Nation really moved our plans forward with their monetary grant of $20,000,” Bieber said. “We worked with the County Board to provide video storage, and Matt Heitpas from the county’s technical support really made this idea a reality. It was a team effort.”

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Public Record

Wed, 08/31/2016 - 7:25am

Shawano Police Department

Aug. 29

Police logged 26 incidents, including the following:

Juvenile — Police responded to a juvenile problem in the 300 block of West Swan Street.

Arrest — A 55-year-old man was taken into custody at the probation and parole offices, 1340 E. Green Bay St.

Theft — A backpack was reported stolen from an unlocked vehicle at Kuckuk Park, 500 Oak Drive.

Arrest — A 54-year-old man was taken into custody at the probation and parole offices, 1340 E. Green Bay St.

Theft — A firearm was reported stolen from a residence in the 700 block of South Union Street.

Disturbance — Police responded to a disturbance in the 800 block of East Richmond Street.

Shawano County Sheriff’s Department

Aug. 29

Deputies logged 33 incidents, including the following:

Theft — A wallet reported stolen on Cattau Beach Drive was later located.

Juvenile — Authorities responded to a juvenile problem on Main Street in the Birnamwood.

Theft — A campaign sign was reported stolen on Lake Drive in the town of Washington.

Theft — Authorities responded to a property theft complaint on Pine Drive in the town of Red Springs.

Clintonville Police Department

Aug. 29

Police logged 14 incidents, including the following:

Disturbance — Police responded to a disturbance on Stewart Street.

Theft — A retail theft was reported on North Main Street.

Hit and Run — Police investigated a property damage hit-and-run on North Main Street.

Warrant — A 34-year-old Clintonville man was arrested on a warrant on Stewart Street.

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