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Updated: 39 min 39 sec ago

Court News

Tue, 08/02/2016 - 9:19pm

Burglary

An Oconto Falls man and two Gillett teens are facing felony theft and burglary charges for an alleged break-in in June.

Terry J. Elsner, 44, of Oconto Falls, Tylor M. Georgia, 17, of Gillett, and Nicholas B. Thomson, 18, of Gillett, could each face a maximum 12½ years in prison and a $25,000 fine if convicted on the burglary charge, and 10 years and a $25,000 fine if convicted of felony theft.

They are accused of breaking into a garage in the town of Green Valley on June 11 and stealing a John Deere UTV valued at more than $10,000.

Elsner is also facing two counts of contributing to the delinquency of a child for allegedly encouraging the two teens to be part of the crime, and four felony counts of felony bail jumping. Each of the counts carries a maximum possible penalty of six years in prison and a $10,000 fine.

Elsner was ordered held on a $5,000 cash bond and is scheduled for an adjourned initial court appearance Monday.

Georgia is free on a $5,000 signature bond and is scheduled for a preliminary hearing Sept. 20.

Thomson is due in court for his initial appearance Aug. 22.

Strangulation, child abuse

A Gresham man is due in court later this month on felony charges of strangulation and suffocation, physical abuse of a child and false imprisonment as a result of an alleged incident in the village on June 26.

Thomas J. Ejnik, 55, is accused of choking and repeatedly striking a 13-year-old boy and preventing him from leaving the residence. According to the criminal complaint, the boy sustained cuts and bruises to his face.

Ejnik could face a maximum six years in prison and a $10,000 fine on each of the counts if found guilty.

He is free on a $750 cash bond and is due in court for an adjourned initial appearance on Aug. 22

Felony theft

An Egg Harbor man has been charged with a felony count of theft in a business setting for allegedly committing contractor fraud in the town of Germania.

Wayne M. Lautenbach, 53, could face a maximum 10 years in prison and a $25,000 fine if found guilty.

He was allegedly paid $87,000 in January 2012 for construction of a log cabin that was never completed, according to the criminal complaint.

The alleged theft was reported to Shawano County authorities in November.

Lautenbach is scheduled for an initial court appearance Oct. 3.

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Public Record

Tue, 08/02/2016 - 8:46am

Shawano Police Department

Aug. 1

Police logged 29 incidents, including the following:

Disturbance — Police responded to a domestic disturbance at the Wisconsin House, 216 E. Green Bay St.

Threatening — Police responded to a threatening complaint in the 600 block of East Fifth Street.

Suspicious — Police responded to a suspicious person complaint at Cleveland and Randall streets.

Suspicious — Police responded to a suspicious person complaint at County Road M and Water Street.

Harassment — Police responded to a harassment complaint in the 200 block of East Center Street.

Theft — Pills were reported stolen in the 300 block of South Sawyer Street.

July 31

Police logged 20 incidents, including the following:

Disorderly — Police responded to a disorderly conduct complaint in the 100 block of South Main Street.

Disturbance — An 18-year-old woman was arrested for domestic violence and battery after a disturbance at the Wisconsin House, 216 E. Green Bay St.

Disturbance — Police responded to a domestic disturbance in the 200 block of East Center Street.

Threatening — Police responded to a threatening complaint in the 500 block of South Sawyer Street.

Disorderly — Police responded to a disorderly conduct complaint in the 400 block of South Union Street.

July 30

Police logged 25 incidents, including the following:

Assault — Police investigated an assault complaint in the 400 block of South Franklin Street.

Disorderly — Police responded to a lewd and lascivious behavior complaint at Maurer and Andrews streets.

Shoplifting — Charlie’s County Market, 521 S. Main St., reported a shoplifting incident.

Suspicious — Police responded to a suspicious person complaint at Walmart, 1244 E. Green Bay St.

Disturbance — Police responded to a report of a fight in progress in the 500 block of South Main Street.

July 29

Police logged 23 incidents, including the following:

Disturbance — Police responded to a disturbance at Fifth and Lafayette streets.

Disturbance — A 29-year-old Shawano man was arrested for disorderly conduct after police responded to a fight in progress in the 400 block of South Franklin Street.

Accident — Police responded to a two-vehicle property damage accident in the 400 block of East Green Bay Street.

OAR — A 22-year-old man was cited for operating after revocation and taken into custody on a probation hold at Lincoln Street and Ridlington Avenue.

Disturbance — Police responded to a disturbance in the 500 block of Prospect Circle.

Warrant — A male subject was taken into custody on a warrant in the 100 block of South Main Street.

Shawano County Sheriff’s Department

Aug. 1

Deputies logged 35 incidents, including the following:

Drug Offense — Authorities investigated a drug complaint at the Ho Chunk Casino, N7198 U.S. Highway 45, in the town of Wittenberg.

Theft — Authorities responded to a theft complaint on County Road MMM in the town of Richmond.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a domestic disturbance on Lawn Road in the town of Lessor.

Harassment — Authorities investigated a harassment complaint on Willow Road in the town of Herman.

Warrant — A male subject was arrested on a warrant on Camp 14 Road in the town of Bartelme.

July 31

Deputies logged 36 incidents, including the following:

Suspicious — Authorities responded to a suspicious vehicle complaint on Boldig Road in the town of Morris.

Suspicious — Authorities responded to a suspicious person complaint on Warrington Avenue in Cecil.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a disturbance on Kucksdorf Lane in the town of Herman.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a disturbance on Woods Road in the town of Wescott.

Suspicious — Authorities responded to a suspicious person complaint on Lake Drive in the town of Wescott.

July 30

Deputies logged 35 incidents, including the following:

Disorderly — Authorities responded to a disorderly conduct complaint on Webb Street in the town of Wittenberg.

Vandalism — Authorities responded to a vandalism complaint on Shady Rest Court in the town of Wescott.

Trespass — Authorities responded to a trespassing complaint on Butternut Road in the town of Herman.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a disturbance on Webb Street in the town of Wittenberg.

Accident — Authorities responded to an injury accident on County Road A in the town of Herman.

July 29

Deputies logged 50 incidents, including the following:

Suspicious — Authorities responded to a suspicious person complaint on Knoke Street in Gresham.

OAR — A 29-year-old woman was cited for operating after revocation on state Highway 47-55 in the town of Wescott.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a disturbance on Meadow Road in the town of Washington.

Harassment — Authorities investigated a harassment complaint on Meadow Road in the town of Washington.

Suspicious — Authorities responded to a suspicious vehicle complaint on Frailing Road in the town of Wescott.

Accidents — Authorities responded to an injury accident on state Highway 29 in the town of Herman.

Clintonville Police Department

Aug. 1

Police logged 13 incidents, including the following:

Juvenile — A juvenile runaway was reported on Harriet Street and the juvenile returned home.

Curfew — A curfew violation was reported on South Main Street.

Juvenile — A juvenile referral was completed for recklessly endangering safety, disorderly conduct and use of a dangerous weapon.

Accident — A two-vehicle property damage accident was reported on East First Street.

July 31

Police logged 11 incidents, including the following:

Accident — A deer-related crash was reported on East Madison Street.

Warrant — A 41-year-old woman was arrested on a New London Warrant.

Harassment — Harassment was reported at Eighth and West streets.

Accident — A two-vehicle accident was reported on Flora Way.

July 30

Police logged 13 incidents, including the following:

Chase — Officer was in a high-speed pursuit on Main Street at 17th Street, and was unable to safely stop the vehicle so the pursuit was terminated.

Fire Call — Fire department was requested to 12th Street at 13th Street for a power line down.

Suspicious — A suspicious incident was reported at Main and Second streets.

July 29

Police logged 13 incidents, including the following:

Disorderly — Disorderly conduct was reported on Flora Circle.

Suspicious — A suspicious incident was reported at Ninth and West streets.

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Network Health names new CEO

Tue, 08/02/2016 - 8:43am

Network Health announced last week that Coreen Dicus-Johnson will assume the role of president and chief executive officer beginning Oct. 1.

“Network Health has been an important player in Wisconsin’s dynamic insurance market,” Dicus-Johnson said. “I look forward to partnering with the leadership team and owners to forge an even stronger position for the organization.”

Most recently, Dicus-Johnson served as the president of Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Central Market, where she was responsible for the management and strategic direction of Franklin and St. Francis hospitals, Midwest Orthopedic Specialty Hospital and Wheaton Franciscan Medical Group, which together generate almost $400 million annually.

Prior to that, she held senior leader roles at WFH in physician and revenue operations, payer contracting and payer relations.

From 1996 to 2004, she served in several roles with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Wisconsin, now known as Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, including corporate development, government relations, contracting, litigation counsel and management of major accounts.

“Coreen is a highly talented leader with extensive experience in hospital management, revenue cycle operations, payer contracting and health insurance products,” said Cathy Jacobson, Froedtert Health president and chief executive office and Network Health board of directors chair. “She brings together a broad and diverse range of experiences from both the provider and the insurance sides of health care to this important leadership role at Network Health.”

Dicus-Johnson earned a bachelor’s degree in communications and public relations from Marquette University and a law degree from DePaul University College of Law. She has been a member of a number of regional and statewide organizations, including the American Cancer Society, the American Lung Association, the American Heart Association, the Wisconsin Law Foundation, Sojourner Family Peace Center and the Marquette University College of Professional Studies Advisory Board.

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Farmers invited to risk management seminar

Tue, 08/02/2016 - 8:42am

Dairy producers have the opportunity to enroll in Farm Service Agency’s Dairy Margin Protection Program now through Sept. 30.

MPP is a risk management tool that allows dairy producers to protect their economic risk from low milk prices, high feed prices or a combination of both. The difference between the milk price and the cost of feed needed to produce that milk is the “margin” protected via the program.

MPP essentially allows a dairy farm to ensure that they have enough cash flow to survive an industrywide poor economic situation. It is one of the tools that can be used to manage the economic risk of producing milk.

University of Wisconsin-Extension and the Farm Service Agency will offer dairy producers a pair of opportunities to learn more about MPP and how to make the right decision for their farms. The workshops will be held at the Oconto/Marinette and Shawano Farm Service Agency offices in August. Producers are welcome to attend either meeting, wherever their farm is located.

The first workshop will occur at 1 p.m. Aug. 9 at the Oconto/Marinette USDA Service Center. The center is located at 410 1/2 E. Main St., just east of the Lena exit from U.S. Highway 141, in the office buildings behind the gas station located on County Road A.

The second workshop will occur at 10 a.m. Aug. 16, at the Shawano USDA Service Center, 603 Lakeland Road, Shawano.

Producers will learn more about the MPP program and their options, and analyze their farm’s best fit within the program if they decide to enroll.

Scott Reuss, UW-Extension crops, soils and horticulture agent for Marinette and Oconto counties, and Farm Service Agency personnel will lead attendees through this discussion.

The margins a farm can choose to protect against range from $4 to $8. To put that in perspective, the calculated margin in the last four years has fluctuated between $3 and $15, with the average being about $8.50. The premiums paid by a farm will vary according to its level of coverage and the amount of milk protected, which can be up to 90 percent of the farm’s highest actual production in the previous three years. Analyzing the cost vs. potential return and risk coverage at differing margin levels will be a significant portion of this workshop.

Preregistration is not required for the free workshop.

For information, contact the appropriate FSA office (Shawano, 715-524-4814 or Lena, 920-829-5406) or Reuss at 715-732-7510 or [email protected].

Dairy producers can also access a wide range of information on the web to help them make this decision. One of the sources of information is the Dairy Markets and Policy website found at http://dairymarkets.org/MPP/.

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Racetrack fan becomes new owner

Sat, 07/30/2016 - 7:36am
Shawano County attraction sells for $285,000By: 

Scott Williams, [email protected]


Contributed Photo An aerial view shows the twisting racetrack at US Air Motorsports Raceway, a 40-acre complex with a racing season that continues until October.
Contributed Photo Racers navigate the 32-foot-wide track at US Air Motorsports Raceway, a Shawano County attraction that opened in 2004.

Shawano County’s renowned US Air Motorsports Raceway is under new ownership midway through its 2016 season of outdoor go-kart races and other events.

Robert Holzmann, a lifelong motorsports fan, has purchased the town of Wescott attraction with an eye on renovations and improvements to a facility he calls “a hidden gem.”

Shawano County real estate records put the sale price at $285,000.

Holzmann, who lives in Fond du Lac County, is part of the family that owns Johnson School Bus Service Inc., which serves the Shawano School District. He works as head of maintenance for the company, and his wife, Judy Holzmann, is vice president.

Holzmann said he has been a fan of the US Air Motorsports facility, and he recently decided with family members to make the investment of becoming owner.

“I just have a passion for motorsports,” he said.

The racetrack’s previous owner was Green Mountain Finance Fund LLC, a Connecticut firm that had previously tried to sell the property at an auction.

Green Mountain Finance officials could not be reached for comment on the sale.

An auction held last summer at the racetrack drew a high bid of $345,000 from an out-of-state buyer who remained unidentified. But the sale was never recorded at the county courthouse, and questions lingered for months about the property’s ownership.

Aaron Carmody, a Door County businessman who offered $340,000 at the auction, said he suspects a bank or other ownership rejected the auction results in hopes of fetching a higher price later. Settling now for $60,000 less, Carmody said, shows that the property owners “screwed themselves.”

“It was an expensive mistake for them,” he said.

The property also had fallen behind on property taxes and could have ended up being seized by Shawano County.

County records earlier this year showed that Green Mountain Finance owed the county taxes totaling $88,939 plus another $14,867 in interest, for a total bill of $103,806. The county was prepared to move toward seizure of the property as soon as September.

County records show that the overdue taxes have been paid and that the property has returned to good standing with the county.

Holzmann would not say whether he or Green Mountain paid the tax bill.

Opened in 2004, the US Air Motorsports facility originally was owned by the religious group known as Samanta Roy Institute of Science and Technology Inc. That group later struggled financially and lost the racetrack in foreclosure in 2012, after which the property sold at auction for $2 million.

The 40-acre complex at W5901 County Road BE includes several buildings, concession stands, a picnic area and more. The 32-foot-wide asphalt track has become a favorite spot for competitive spectator events involving go-karts, motorcycles and other racing vehicles.

An event this weekend with “drifter” cars is expected to draw about 2,500 people from throughout the United States and Canada.

The facility’s season continues from April until October.

Patti Peterson, tourism manager for the Shawano Country Chamber of Commerce, said US Air Motorsports has been active in chamber events and has worked with civic leaders locally to promote the racetrack as an attraction with a positive impact on area business.

“They’ve been great to work with,” Peterson said. “I look forward to continuing a good partnership with them.”

Holzmann said he is retaining the attraction’s longtime management team of Pat and Ann Polk.

In a prepared statement, his new company, known as RFH Racing LLC, announced the racetrack purchase and said the new ownership would consider renovations and other improvements for the 2017 season, including “new opportunities for public and private events.”

No details on the possible renovations were announced.

“With the proper investment and promotion, US Air can further enhance Shawano’s tourism and provide growth to the local economy,” the statement said.

Holzmann, whose family has a vacation home on Shawano Lake, said he raced motorcycles and snowmobiles starting as a child, and his 19-year-old son, Sam, has taken up racing recently at the US Air facility. The family has frequented the track as spectators, and Holzmann watched the real estate auction last summer when Green Mountain Finance tried to find a buyer.

When he later realized that the auction sale was not going through, Holzmann began to think about making his own purchase offer.

“This time,” he said, “we couldn’t let it slip away.”

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SACF: 25 years of helping

Sat, 07/30/2016 - 7:33am
Foundation’s impact felt throughout Shawano areaBy: 

Scott Williams, [email protected]


Contributed Photo Farmer Greg Riesenberg, left, gets his cholesterol checked by Dawn Dingeldein, a staff member of Rural Health Initiative, a group supported by the Shawano Area Community Foundation.

Editor’s note: This is last in a monthly series of articles celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Shawano Area Community Foundation.

The history of the Shawano Area Community Foundation is the history of a community reaching out with a helping hand for those in need.

Whether it is farmers lacking health care, students needing assistance or battered women seeking shelter, the community foundation has been there with the financial resources to answer the call.

Celebrating its 25-year anniversary, the community foundation has grown from initial donations totaling $100,000 when it was created to an endowment valued at about $5 million supporting a broad-based charitable network.

“They’ve been great partners,” said Rhonda Strebel, executive director of Rural Health Initiative, one of many groups that the foundation has supported.

“They’ve never turned us down,” added Stacey Cicero, executive director of the Safe Haven domestic violence shelter.

The foundation got its start in 1990 when a small group of civic leaders decided that Shawano needed an institution for pooling together charitable dollars that could be used for a variety of civic improvements. The initial goal was $100,000, based on the hope that 100 people would be willing to contribute $1,000 each for such an endeavor.

The Shawano-based organization today has about $5 million under investment, generating more than $300,000 a year in interest and other income. The earned income funds the foundation’s far-reaching charitable grants and programs throughout the region.

Grants in recent years have been distributed to a long list of recipients, including Wolf River Habitat for Humanity, Shawano Pathways, the Shawano County Historical Society, the Shawano County Arts Council, New Tribes Mission, and Dakota Boys and Girls Ranch.

Chris Baldwin, executive director of Red River Riders, a horseback riding farm for people with disabilities, said funding from the community foundation has allowed her group to purchase additional horses, add needed equipment and offer scholarships to clients in need.

With the foundation’s backing, Red River Riders has grown to include a dozen trained horses with an indoor arena serving about 70 people annually with therapeutic horseback riding activities.

“They have helped us quite a bit,” Baldwin said of the foundation. “Every time they help us, it is a great need that they are covering for us.”

The charitable foundation is affiliated with the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region, an Appleton-based network that provides infrastructure support and technical service.

To celebrate its 25th anniversary, the Shawano group is wrapping up 12 months of special activities.

Part of the yearlong celebration included the opening of the SAM25 homeless shelter in Shawano, which received $50,000 in funding from the community foundation.

Donors to the foundation can either support the overall mission with unrestricted gifts, or they can designate a contribution to benefit a specific cause of their choosing. More than 70 different funds within the foundation’s endowment are earmarked to address issues such as education, mental health, youth programs and domestic violence.

One of those funds, the Gresham Scholarship Fund, provides financial assistance every year to promising graduates of the Gresham School District.

Bob Klopke, director of the scholarship fund and former longtime Gresham school principal, said turning local donations over to the community foundation has ensured that the funds are both invested wisely and administered professionally. Since its creation in 2002, the fund has grown to about $500,000, and the investment income pays for 10 to 15 scholarships annually.

The amount of the scholarships has climbed from $400 per student to $1,750 per student, each awarded after a student’s first successful semester of college.

Klopke said he credits the stewardship of community foundation officials with allowing the scholarship program to enjoy steady growth and sustained success.

“They have the right qualifications,” he said. “It’s probably better than we could get from anyone else.”

Other initiatives supported by the foundation over the years include the Shawano Food Center, Junior Achievement, Navarino Nature Center, Folk Music Festival and other student scholarship programs.

Strebel said the foundation provided seed money in 2004 to get the Rural Health Initiative started in 2004 with its program of in-home health services for farmers, especially those in remote areas. The group now serves about 500 farmers annually in Shawano County and has extended into Marathon, Outagamie and Waupaca counties.

The community foundation also has helped pay for the Rural Health Initiative to add new equipment, implement new services and grow its operation to a budget of more than $200,000 a year.

“They’ve been very important to us,” Strebel said.

At the Safe Haven shelter for victims of domestic violence or sexual abuse, the community foundation has provided several grants — typically $5,000 each — to help Safe Haven equip its facility with computers, furniture and more.

Cicero said her group has its own endowment worth more than $100,000, and foundation officials have helped Safe Haven identify possible funding sources, in a relationship that has grown stronger over the years.

“It’s certainly been an ongoing process,” Cicero said. “They’ve been instrumental in helping us.”

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Property owner in proposed RDA district looking to sell to city

Sat, 07/30/2016 - 7:32am
Plan commission will take up question WednesdayBy: 

Tim Ryan, [email protected]

The owner of a residential property located within the Shawano Redevelopment Authority’s proposed blight elimination district wants to know whether the city is interested in acquiring the property.

The Shawano Plan Commission on Wednesday will discuss what if any action should be taken regarding the property at 228 S. Washington St.

City Administrator Brian Knapp said the property owner, Shannon Heling, contacted the city after learning it was included within the proposed RDA district and asked what the city was expecting in terms of improvements to the property.

The property was determined to be blighted due to the need for exterior updates, including peeling paint and a deteriorating facade.

Knapp said Heling then asked whether the city would have any interest in purchasing it, given that it is located next to a city parking lot and just across the street from Franklin Park, where the farmers market operates.

Knapp said plan commission officials will take up that question Wednesday.

The multi-family residence is one of nearly 200 properties in the proposed RDA district where blighted conditions were observed, according to a study done for the RDA by consulting firm Vierbicher, though it’s not among the 13 areas the RDA considers a priority.

There are 391 properties within the boundaries of the proposed district. Just over half of them are considered blighted or in need of redevelopment.

Blighted conditions described in the RDA project plan include windows in poor condition, peeling paint, exposed wood, rusted metal, boarded-up storefronts and bricked up windows, broken awnings, cracked and crumbling facades, abandoned signage, and outdoor dumping of garbage and debris.

The plan commission will meet at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday at City Hall, 127 S. Sawyer St.

The meeting will kick off with a public hearing on a conditional use permit that would allow Belmark Inc. to construct a flexible packaging plant on 15 acres of city-owned property in an undeveloped area north of County Road B, east of Waukechon Street and west of Industrial Drive.

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Court News

Sat, 07/30/2016 - 7:31am

Child abuse

A Shawano man is facing a felony charge of physical abuse of a child after a fight with a 15-year-old at the Skateboard Park in Shawano on Thursday.

Joshua F. Gartner, 33, was ordered held on a $5,000 cash bond at his initial court appearance Friday and is scheduled for an adjourned initial appearance Monday.

According to the criminal complaint, police were called to a fight in progress at the park, 107 E. Elizabeth St., just after 8 p.m. and were informed a 15-year-old boy was in a fight with an adult who fled the scene on foot.

Gartner was arrested a short time later on Lieg Avenue.

The 15-year-old had scratches on his neck and arms and complained of a sore wrist, but declined medical attention.

Gartner could face a maximum six years in prison and a $10,000 fine if convicted on the felony count. He is also charged with misdemeanor counts of disorderly conduct and lewd and lascivious behavior for allegedly exposing his butt during the incident.

Possession of narcotics, meth

Two men were arrested for possession of narcotics and methamphetamine after a traffic stop Monday in Aniwa.

Matthew B. Leffel, 35, and Aaron S. Dudzik, 31, both of Aniwa, were pulled over on County Road Z by a state trooper who noticed their vehicle was missing a front license plate and the occupants weren’t wearing seat belts.

A K-9 search of the vehicle turned up baggies that contained suspected cocaine and heroin, according to the complaint, as well as various drug paraphernalia, including marijuana pipes, syringes, baggies, a small spoon with a burnt edge, cotton swabs and tweezers.

Authorities also found a silver revolver, according to the complaint.

Both men have been charged with possession of meth and possession of narcotic drugs, which normally carries a maximum possible penalty of 3 1/2 years in prison and a $10,000 fine. However, those penalties could be enhanced because of previous convictions.

Dudzik, who has a previous conviction for drug offenses in Marathon County, according to court records, could also face a maximum 10 years in prison and $25,000 fine for being a felon in possession of a firearm if convicted.

Leffel was ordered held on a $2,500 cash bond after an initial appearance in court on Friday. He is due back in court for an adjourned initial appearance on Aug. 8.

Dudzik was ordered held on a $500 cash bond and is also due back in court for an adjourned initial appearance on Aug. 8.

Burglary, auto theft

A Cecil teen is facing felony charges of burglary and operating a vehicle without the owner’s consent after allegedly breaking into a home in the town of Washington and stealing the keys to a vehicle Thursday.

Cole L. Danielson, 18, could face a maximum 12 1/2 years in prison and a $25,000 fine if found guilty of burglary and 3 1/2 years and a $10,000 fine if convicted of operating a vehicle without the owner’s consent.

He was ordered held on a $500 cash bond at a court appearance Friday and is scheduled for a preliminary hearing on Aug. 23.

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Public Record

Sat, 07/30/2016 - 7:30am

Shawano Police Department

July 28

Police logged 30 incidents, including the following:

Suspicious — Police responded to a suspicious person complaint in the 900 block of South Sawyer Street.

Shoplifting — Kwik Trip, 1241 E. Green Bay St., reported a shoplifting incident after a surveillance camera showed a man shoving a six-pack of beer down his pants.

Juvenile — Police responded to a juvenile problem in the 700 block of South Union Street.

Fraud — Police investigated an internet fraud complaint in the 300 block of North Lafayette Street.

Harassment — Police responded to a harassment complaint in the 700 block of South Union Street.

Juvenile — Police responded to a juvenile problem in the 100 block of Aspen Court.

Disturbance — A 33-year-old Shawano man was arrested for battery to a 15-year-old child, disorderly conduct and lewd conduct for exposing his buttocks during a fight at the skateboard park, 107 E. Elizabeth St.

Shawano County Sheriff’s Department

July 28

Deputies logged 43 incidents, including the following:

Trespass — Authorities responded to a trespassing complaint on County Road C in the town of Angelica.

Auto Theft — A vehicle was reported stolen on Fifth Street in Mattoon.

Auto Theft — A vehicle was reported stolen on Derby Lane in the town of Washington.

Disorderly — Authorities responded to a disorderly conduct complaint on U.S. Highway 45 in the town of Wittenberg.

Fraud — Authorities investigated an identity theft complaint on County Road E in the town of Washington.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a disturbance on County Road Z in Aniwa.

Theft — Gas cans were reported stolen from a boat on Zirbel Court in the town of Wescott.

Theft — Tires were reported stolen from a vehicle on U.S. Highway 45 in the town of Aniwa.

Auto Theft — A vehicle was reported stolen at the Ho-Chunk Casino, N7198 U.S. Highway 45, in the town of Wittenberg.

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Family wasn’t horsing around when it came to pets

Sat, 07/30/2016 - 7:21am
By: 

Lorna Marquardt, Leader Columnist

Throughout our marriage, we have always had pets. When we were first married, my hubby had a horse. There are those who do not think a horse is a pet; to them, a horse is considered livestock. Others have defined a horse as a companion animal. To my husband, his horse was his friend, his pet.

Her name was Maggie. She was a beautiful Morgan horse. As years went by, two Arabians, Ruby and Cain, and a quarter horse named Sam joined Maggie. We have a little barn and wooded area in the town of Wescott. I enjoyed going there with my hubby and watching him with the horses. He would call them by name, and they would come running from the woods at top speed.

Horses have a pecking order. They would line up along the fence in order: Maggie, Sam, Ruby and Cain. They waited their turn for a carrot or apple. My hubby enjoyed trail rides, and he generally took Maggie or Sam. Ruby was our daughter’s horse, and Cain was mine. I took riding lessons and thought I was a good rider until one day my horse stopped abruptly, and I kept going. That ended my riding.

The horses brought my hubby a great deal of joy, but there were heartbreaks, too. One day, I received a call from him. His voice was tense and his words urgent, “Lorna, call Doc Prudom and tell him it’s an emergency.” I didn’t ask questions. When he came home later that day, he wiped away tears as he told me what happened.

Lightning struck the electric fence. The current went into the ground, came up Maggie’s leg and out of her chest. She had a hole in her chest about the size of a fist. Doc Prudom wasn’t sure if she would make it. He told my hubby it would take a real commitment from him to try to nurse her back to health.

That is exactly what he did. He faithfully went to the barn three times daily. The ointment numbed the pain and kept the area from getting infected. It was a long process. The bond between my hubby and his beloved friend was evident. Maggie healed, and the only evidence of her injury was a scar. She was able to go on trail rides after a year, and together they enjoyed many more happy trails together.

Through the years, we had other pets. including three boxers: Jinx, Duke and Captain. Now I must admit, I have never been totally enamored with dogs, but our children and my hubby loved them; I put up with them. That is, until Captain came along!

We purchased Captain, a beautiful 2-year-old boxer on a Saturday morning. By Saturday night, I was apprehensive. Captain found a piece of my clothing and ran around the house with it hanging from his mouth.

Things went downhill from there. When I took him outside, he refused to go potty. When I brought him back inside, he would immediately go on the floor. I guess he was telling me he didn’t like me, and I’m afraid the feeling was quickly becoming mutual.

I went Christmas shopping. I normally don’t spend a lot on shoes, but I had several parties coming up and I splurged on an expensive pair of black heels. I made several trips to the car and placed the bags on the table. When I was outside, Captain found my new shoes. After I brought the last of the bags inside, I spotted Captain in the corner chewing on my shoe like it was a steak!

I scolded him, and he grabbed a stuffed goose I had dressed in a Santa outfit, complete with a Santa hat. He was so adorable. I guess Captain thought so, too, because he tossed him up into the air like a rubber ball. Soon the floor was covered with stuffing and a chewed up Santa hat!

Although our kids laughed at some of Captain’s antics, they soon tired of having a crabby mom. They agreed Captain was disrupting our happy home, and he needed a different environment.

I contacted the gentleman who sold Captain to us and he was more than happy to take him back (no charge) The only reason he sold him was because he needed the money at the time. He missed his dog.

They greeted one another affectionately, and I headed for home smiling! Life was back to normal in the Marquardt house.

Then we bought our kids a myna bird, and well … you already know that story.

Now, we have Mittens, our beloved cat! We are grateful she allows us to live in her house.

The answer from last week’s question is: Shawano was incorporated as a city on March 19, 1874. The first elected mayor was D.H. Pulcifer.

This week’s question is: How did Slab City get its name?

Lorna Marquardt is the former mayor of Shawano.Rate this article:  Select ratingGive it 1/5Give it 2/5Give it 3/5Give it 4/5Give it 5/5 No votes yet

New club for kids set to launch

Thu, 07/28/2016 - 10:55pm
Supporters attend fundraising kickoffBy: 

Scott Williams, [email protected]


Leader Photo by Scott Williams Gathered inside Luigi’s Pizza & Pasta in downtown Shawano, supporters of the Boys & Girls Club of Shawano gather Thursday for the club’s kickoff event.
Leader Photo by Scott Williams More than 30 people turned out for Thursday’s kickoff event at Luigi’s Pizza & Pasta for the newly formed Boys & Girls Club of Shawano, which starts offering services in January.

Supporters of the new Boys & Girls Club of Shawano kicked off their founders campaign Thursday to launch the group offering after-school services for local kids.

More than 30 people gathered in downtown Shawano to learn about the new club and the fundraising needed to make it a success.

Among those in attendance were Shawano School District Superintendent Gary Cumberland, Shawano County 4-H coordinator Joe Stellato and Leadership Shawano County program manager Wendy Crawford.

Officials from the Boys & Girls Club of Green Bay also were on hand to explain their organization’s role in creating the Shawano club as a charter group.

The event was held at Luigi’s Pizza & Pasta, 607 S. Main St.

The Boys & Girls Club of Shawano will begin offering services in January for third-, fourth- and fifth-graders inside Olga Brener Intermediate School in Shawano. The club is designed for working families whose children are left without supervision after school.

For a fee tentatively set at $10 a year, kids will be able to participate in structured after-school programming focused on education and career development, character and leadership, health and life skills, sports and recreation, and the arts. Other details, such as the exact hours of operation at Olga Brener, have not been announced.

A steering committee of civic leaders is launching the program after three years of planning and discussion.

The Green Bay club will provide administrative support while allowing the new Shawano group to function independently. It will be the first time that the Green Bay club has established a chartered site outside of Green Bay.

Under the rules of the national Boys & Girls Club organization, the new club must start with one year of operating funds in the bank, estimated at $100,000, and with pledges for enough funding for the following two years. Organizers say they have nearly reached the first $100,000 goal, but many more donations will be needed to keep the group going.

For information or to make a donation, call 715-526-6136.

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RDA consultant plans council presentation

Thu, 07/28/2016 - 10:52pm
Blight boundaries to be discussedBy: 

Tim Ryan, [email protected]

City officials will get a presentation at their Common Council meeting next month from the consultant working with the Shawano Redevelopment Authority explaining how the boundary was arrived at for a proposed blight elimination district.

The council rejected the proposed boundary earlier this month, after hearing concerns from property owners within the district, and sent it back to the RDA for reconsideration.

However, city officials haven’t given the RDA any guidance on what a new boundary should look like.

“We’re going back to square one,” City Administrator Brian Knapp said, in terms of explaining to the council “the intentions of the boundary and how it was arrived at.”

Knapp said the presentation, which will precede the council’s regularly monthly meeting, will be followed by discussion addressing city officials’ concerns about the boundary and getting their input on possible changes.

Planning consultant Vierbicher will make its presentation to the council at 4:30 p.m. Aug. 10 at City Hall, 127 S. Sawyer St.

RDA officials met last week to discuss how to address some what they said were misunderstandings about the redevelopment district.

Assistant City Administrator Eddie Sheppard, who has been working closely with the RDA as support staff, said being in the district doesn’t necessarily make a property blighted.

“If you’re in a blight elimination district and you’re not blighted, or you make improvements to your property, your life goes on as if nothing ever happened,” he said.

Sheppard said the RDA “probably missed the concern” that property owners might have about being in the district because the proposed redevelopment district includes two Tax Incremental Finance districts already designated as blight elimination areas.

The RDA district roughly follows the contours of TIF districts already designated along Main Street from the Wolf River bridge on the north to Wescott Avenue on the south, and along Green Bay Street from Main Street on the west to Rusch Road on the east.

There are 391 properties within the boundaries of the RDA district. Just over half of them are considered blighted or in need of redevelopment.

Under state law, a municipality can designate a blight redevelopment district if at least 50 percent of the property within the proposed district is blighted, which means “a predominance of structures, buildings, or improvements that are dilapidated, deteriorated, obsolete, or conditions that are detrimental to public health and safety.”

Sheppard said another misconception the RDA hopes to address is the effect on property values of being located in a blight elimination district.

“It doesn’t go on your deed, you don’t have to list it when you sell your property,” he said. “There’s no place where it’s going to be posted. It’s simply a district, and 50 percent is blight and 50 percent is not. It’s not going to affect property values. What affects their property values is if they make improvements or if they don’t.”

Another chief concern has been the RDA’s statutory power to invoke eminent domain and take matters to court if necessary.

Officials say they are hoping for cooperation from owners to address areas of blight within the district and to either provide or direct them to resources available to help them make improvements to their properties.

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Wall of Honor to recognize MISD grads

Thu, 07/28/2016 - 10:51pm
1st phase honors military veterans

The Menominee Indian School District is about to embark on a new project to recognize Menominee Indian High School graduates who have gone on to serve in the U.S. military or graduated from college.

A three-phase Wall of Honor is going to be established in the high school cafeteria during the 2016-17 school year.

“This wall will be a visible demonstration that our high school graduates are prepared for careers and college when they leave MIHS,” District Superintendent Wendell Waukau said. “We want our current students to see how successful our graduates have been by honoring those who have gone on to serve our country in the military as well as those who have graduated from college.”

The Wall of Honor project will be developed in three phases:

• Phase One: Military veterans. Information is now being gathered through the Menominee County Veterans Association and Menominee Indian School District to develop a list of MISD grads who went on to serve in the military. Each veteran will have a plaque with name, graduation year, branch of service, years served and photo. It is anticipated this phase will be installed during the 2016-17 school year. Adrian Miller, from the county veterans services office, and John Teller, from MISD, are coordinating the effort to gather the information.

• Phase Two: Four-year college graduates. This part of the Wall of Honor will recognize MIHS grads who went on to a college or university and graduated with a minimum of a bachelor’s degree. Each grad will have a plaque with name, graduation year, college attended and degree received. This phase will be installed during the 2017 -18 school year.

• Phase Three: Two-year college graduates. The final phase of the Wall of Honor will recognize MIHS grads who went on to earn an associate degree. Each grad will have a plaque with name, graduation year, educational institute and degree received. This phase will be installed during the 2018-19 school year.

For Phase One, MISD is asking community residents to help identify graduates who have gone on to serve in the military.

“We are going to need information as well as photos, if they are available,” Teller said. “We want to do this right and make sure we don’t leave anyone out who rightfully deserves to be on the Wall of Honor.”

Anyone with information about an MISD grad who served in the military is asked to forward the information to Glenda Kaquatosh at the district office or [email protected].

“Even if we have just some of the information, it will help us track down the rest of it,” Teller said.

Waukau is excited about the message the Wall of Honor will send to students.

“It will not only provide outstanding recognition for those graduates who have gone on to other successful efforts, but it will also serve as a constant reminder to our current students that they too can be successful,” Waukau said. “They can walk in the steps of others who graduated before them.”

Menominee Indian School District serves approximately 850 students in four schools: Keshena Primary School, Menominee Indian Middle School, Menominee Indian High School and an Adult Learning Center.

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Public Record

Thu, 07/28/2016 - 10:39pm

Shawano Police Department

July 27

Police logged 17 incidents, including the following:

Trespass — Police responded to a trespassing complaint in the 800 block of South Evergreen Street.

Disturbance — Police responded to a disturbance in the 400 block of South Sawyer Street.

Arrest — A 25-year-old man was taken into custody at the probation and parole offices, 1340 E. Green Bay St.

Shawano County Sheriff’s Department

July 27

Deputies logged 37 incidents, including the following:

Trespass — Authorities responded to a trespassing complaint on Knoke Street in Gresham.

Drug Offense — Authorities investigated a drug complaint at the Ho-Chunk Casino, N7198 U.S. Highway 45 in the town of Wittenberg.

Burglary — A burglary was reported on Eul Court in the town of Wescott.

Harassment — Authorities responded to a harassment complaint on Smalley Street in the town of Wescott.

Disorderly — Authorities responded to a disorderly conduct complaint on County Road MM in the town of Richmond.

Clintonville Police Department

July 27

Police logged 10 incidents, including the following:

Disturbance — Police responded to a domestic dispute on Morning Glory Drive.

Harassment — A juvenile was cited for harassment on 11th Street.

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Court News

Thu, 07/28/2016 - 10:39pm

Hit and run — reckless injury

A Shawano man has been charged with felony counts of reckless injury and hit-and-run causing injury after an incident Sunday in the town of Wescott in which he allegedly struck a pedestrian and fled the scene.

Anthony J. Schwartz, 26, was allegedly involved in an altercation with another patron at the Blind Squirrel on Lake Drive in Wescott just prior to the incident, according to the criminal complaint.

He went to his vehicle and left the parking lot at high speed, according to witnesses, striking a man who had broken up the fight in the bar. The man sustained head and neck injuries, according to the complaint.

Sheriff’s deputies spotted Schwartz’s vehicle a short time later and pulled it over after seeing it go through a stop sign at state Highway 22 and County Road R, according to the complaint.

The complaint states a preliminary breath test on Schwartz showed a blood-alcohol level of 0.27 percent, more than three times the legal limit.

Schwartz could face a maximum 12 1/2 years in prison and a $25,000 fine on the charge of reckless injury if convicted. He could also face a maximum nine months imprisonment and a $10,000 fine on the felony count of hit and run causing injury.

He is also charged with a misdemeanor count of first-offense OWI causing injury.

Schwartz was released on a $500 cash bond and $4,500 signature bond after an appearance before Judge James Habeck on Monday.

He is due back in court for an adjourned initial appearance on Aug. 29.

Felony retail theft

A Green Bay man already suspected in a series of shoplifting incident in two other counties is facing a charge of felony retail theft in Shawano County after allegedly making off with a TV from Walmart in February.

Kingsley M. Cottrell, 27, is accused of stealing a 55-inch Vizio television from the Shawano Walmart at 1244 E. Green Bay St. The TV was valued at about $700, making the theft a felony.

According to the complaint, surveillance video had identified the suspect as Cottrell. The store had previously received a “Be on the Lookout” for Cottrell, along with his picture, from the Walmart in Green Bay, according to the criminal complaint.

The complaint states Cottrell was suspected in multiple thefts in Green Bay and Outagamie.

Cottrell could face a maximum 3 1/2 years in prison if convicted. He is also charged with two counts of felony bail jumping, which carries a maximum 6 years and $10,000 fine.

Cottrell has three felony retail theft cases pending in Brown County and two felony bail jumping cases in Outagamie County.

No court date has been set in the Shawano County case.

Child abuse - bodily harm

A Cecil man is facing a felony charge of physical abuse of a child-intentionally causing bodily harm after an incident in Shawano on Saturday.

Christopher N. Brunner, 46, is accused of choking and throwing an 11-year-old child during a cookout in the city.

Brunner could face a maximum six years in prison and $10,000 fine if found guilty.

He was released on a $1,000 signature bond and is due in court for an adjourned initial appearance on Aug. 15

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CRI employee completes Leadership Wisconsin program

Thu, 07/28/2016 - 10:36pm

Monica Vick, of Shawano, was among 13 state residents celebrated as graduates of Leadership Wisconsin on July 16.

Vick works at Cooperative Resources International.

Participants in the two-year Leadership Wisconsin program studied issues such as health care, education, agriculture, energy and changing demographics. In addition, they traveled to Washington, D.C., to study federal policy, and to North Dakota to look at how the natural resource extraction industry there connects to Wisconsin’s economy and larger national energy issues. The program culminated with a visit to Kazakhstan to help develop global leadership skills.

“I would like to personally thank each of my financial sponsors,” Vick said. “Your investment will not be wasted. To my friends and co-workers, thank you for your continued encouragement over the past two years. Leadership Wisconsin taught me the importance of community engagement and I am grateful for the experience.”

Leadership Wisconsin is a nonprofit whose educational programs are delivered through University of Wisconsin-Extension’s Cooperative Extension division. The program, formerly known as the Wisconsin Rural Leadership Program, graduated its first class in 1986.

The program’s over 400 alumni across the state are trained to help create positive change in their organizations, communities and Wisconsin.

Designed for residents from diverse backgrounds who share a strong desire to actively participate in meeting the challenges facing their organizations and communities, Leadership Wisconsin helps individuals discover their leadership passion, potential and philosophy. Participants gain a broadened understanding of local, state, and national issues, and are prepared to apply their leadership skills to effect positive change in a dynamic multicultural world.

In addition to University of Wisconsin-Extension, major support for the program is provided by the Wisconsin Counties Association.

For information, visit www.leadershipwisconsin.org or call 608-263-0817.

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CMN discovers gems from the past

Wed, 07/27/2016 - 10:38pm
College re-creating Woodland Bowl pageantBy: 

Lee Pulaski, [email protected]


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Bruce Wilber, grandson of “Gems of Yesteryear” writer/director James Frechette, gives a monologue during a rehearsal Thursday at the College of Menominee Nation. Wilber will be narrating the pageant, the same as his grandfather did in 1954.
Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Lloyd Frieson, who will be playing Tecumseh in “Gems of Yesteryear,” records some dialogue Thursday in the digital media lab at the College of Menominee Nation. The dialogue will be played during the pageant performance on Aug. 3, with the actors pantomiming to tell the story.

A Menominee Nation tradition is returning to the grounds of the Woodland Bowl in Keshena, 80 years after its construction.

The College of Menominee Nation will re-create an original pageant that debuted in 1954 as part of the 50th anniversary celebration of the Menominee Nation Contest Powwow. The show begins at dusk on Aug. 3.

Although the Woodland Bowl now mainly serves as the site of Menominee powwows, the arena was built in 1937 as a theatrical facility, according to Ryan Winn, CMN English and theater professor.

A group called the Pageant Players Guild formed to produce shows called the Menominee Pageants, which were held annually until the 1960s, Winn said, when the federal government terminated the Menominee’s recognized status as a tribe.

“They were an exhibition of the traditional Menominee stories, mostly histories, as well as the dances and the music that were common,” Winn said. “Originally when they started, they corresponded with the Keshena Fair, so they’d have all these non-native tourists there, and they would put on these as a way to entertain the crowd and celebrate their culture.”

The 1954 pageant, titled “The Gems of Yesteryear,” collected scenes from the guild’s previous pageants. One of the scenes re-creates the moment when the Menominee encountered the French, while other scenes depict other moments of tribal history, Winn said.

“That history has been forgotten, or it has gone largely unknown,” he said. “This play talks about the important moments in history.”

The pageant also showcases the dances of the time period and explains what they mean culturally. Winn noted that many dances, such as the Dance of Welcome, the Friendship Dance and the Snake Dance, to name a few, are still practiced today, but there was one dance, the Green Corn Dance, that is not practiced as much today and required him to do a lot of research.

Winn liked the 1954 pageant script, written by the late James Frechette, because of the references to previous pageants being intertwined with the current events of the day. The termination of the tribe’s status was approved by Congress in 1954 but did not take effect until 1961, and “Gems of Yesteryear” addressed the changes that were forthcoming as a result of the tribe’s federal termination and the formation of Menominee County.

“Termination was detrimental to all art and all of Menominee culture at that point in history because it changed everything,” Winn said. “You went from a self-sustaining tribe to one that had their hospital shut down and paying for their own BIA (Bureau of Indian Affairs) agents.”

Winn was asked in 2011 to come up with the re-creation of a traditional Menominee pageant, but when he tried to research past pageants, he was only able to find one complete script and another that was about 80 percent complete.

Frechette’s daughter, Grace Wilbur, had the original script her father had typed, and she shared it with Winn after learning about his project.

“She gave the original copy of his typed script to the college for us to use,” Winn said. “We have the original script and the director’s notes, written by hand.”

The only addition to the new show will be narration telling who played a certain part in 1954 and who will be performing it Aug. 3.

Although the script and director’s notes were intact, it took a lot of research and interviews to ensure the stage was re-created correctly. Winn held community meetings and interviewed tribal members who remember the pageant era.

“I would get invited to people’s homes to discuss it, or I’d get an email here and there. I’d find newspaper articles,” Winn said.

Winn also had to find speakers of the traditional Menominee language to fill in some gaps in the script.

Written in English, the script indicated when passages would need to be spoken in Menominee, but the Menominee passages were not in the script. In the 1950s, most Menominee still spoke the language fluently, so there was no need to put in the Menominee words, Winn said. Today, however, fewer Menominee speak the language.

Menominee pageants were a mixture of pantomiming, live music and dancing, and Winn said the 2016 show will be the same. The show’s oration will be recorded, enhanced with sound effects, and then performed with the actors speaking their lines along with the recorded track.

Although the pageant begins at dusk, the audience will be treated to recordings made by members of the original Pageant Players Guild beginning at 6:30 p.m. The show lasts two hours, with an intermission during which patrons can purchase food and beverages.

AT A GLANCE

WHAT: Re-creation of the 1954 “Gems of Yesteryear” Menominee pageant

WHEN: Dusk, Aug. 3

WHERE: Woodland Bowl, Keshena

ADMISSION: Free

FYI: All dancers are welcome to join the production on the night of the show, but should check in with the lead dancers Thomas Pecore and Jamie Awonohopay prior to the show.

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State lowering speed limit near hospital

Wed, 07/27/2016 - 10:35pm
Not enough traffic for roundaboutBy: 

Scott Williams, [email protected]

Motorists driving past Shawano’s new hospital soon will find lower speed limits — but not a roundabout — aimed at alleviating traffic congestion.

State highway planners have determined that traffic near ThedaCare Medical Center-Shawano is not heavy enough to warrant a roundabout or stoplight at state Highway 22 and County Road B.

The state instead plans to lower the speed limit from 35 mph to 30 mph on Highway 22 just north of the hospital to help motorists navigate into traffic and keep moving.

Tony Kemnitz, a state traffic safety engineer, said the lower speed limit will indirectly alleviate congestion by easing backups on County Road B outside the hospital.

“It’s kind of a side benefit,” Kemnitz said. “It just all came together.”

The lowered speed limit should take effect with the posting of new road signs by this fall.

The state conducted a study of traffic patterns around ThedaCare’s new facility, 100 County Road B, after local law enforcement officials voiced concern that a growing number of motorists in the area was contributing to congestion and possibly safety hazards.

Shawano County Sheriff Adam Bieber said although lowering the speed limit will help, he favors building a roundabout to reduce the risk of serious traffic collisions at the intersection.

“We should not wait until someone is seriously injured or killed to make the changes that are obvious,” Bieber said.

The new hospital, which is large enough to serve more than 100,000 people a year, opened last September at the same time that ThedaCare closed the Shawano Medical Center at 309 N. Bartlett St. The new hospital is next to Shawano Community High School, which also generates high volumes of traffic, including school buses.

Brian Grieves, a chiropractor doing business in the area, said congestion is noticeable at peak travel times during the school year when students are arriving and leaving the high school en masse.

As a member of the Shawano County Highway Safety Commission, Grieves said he is uncertain whether the situation is serious enough to warrant a stoplight or roundabout. But he expressed gratitude that state highway officials are willing to consider changes.

“It’s obviously good to see they’ve taken notice,” Grieves said. “I’m in favor of making it as safe as possible.”

After earlier studying traffic volumes around the new hospital, the state Department of Transportation this summer conducted a study on how fast motorists drive through the area. Researchers used equipment to check passing vehicles on Highway 22 between June 14 and June 16.

Kemnitz presented the findings this week to the county Highway Safety Commission, reporting that motorists generally were driving in compliance with posted speed limits. At least 85 percent of the time, most were not exceeding the speed limits by more than about 2 mph, he said.

“We did not find a speeding problem,” he said.

Researchers also examined road designs, land use patterns and other factors to determine that the speed limit north of the hospital should be lowered to 30 mph going in either direction on Highway 22.

In ruling out a stoplight or roundabout at the intersection with County Road B, the state calculated that existing peak traffic volumes of 175 vehicles per hour would have to increase to 275 per hour in order to justify such an investment. Kemnitz estimated that stoplights would cost $250,000 and a roundabout possibly $1 million to $2 million.

He said the state would continue to monitor the congestion near ThedaCare’s facility.

“We’re aware that this is going on,” he said.

Bieber, who also serves on the county safety commission, said that lowering the speed limit near the hospital will benefit residents and pedestrians, and also will help reduce injuries if any crashes occur on Highway 222.

“Ultimately,” he added, “a roundabout is the safest and most efficient option.”

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Gallagher: Politicians put careers over country

Wed, 07/27/2016 - 10:35pm
Green Bay Republican seeking 8th District seatBy: 

Tim Ryan, [email protected]


Michael Gallagher

Mike Gallagher, one of three candidates in the Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District next month, views his possible role in Congress much as he did his role serving in Iraq.

“The system will be better served if there were more private citizens from all walks of life who treat this more like a deployment than a career,” he said.

Gallagher, of Green Bay, sat down with a Shawano Leader reporter during a visit to the city Tuesday.

Gallagher served seven years on active duty as a human intelligence/counterintelligence officer and regional affairs officer for the Middle East and North Africa, earning the rank of captain. During his service he deployed twice to Al Anbar Province, Iraq, as a commander of intelligence teams.

Gallagher blames the Obama administration and “leading from behind” as the reasons for the deterioration in conditions in Iraq since he left in 2008, where the town he had been deployed to is now under ISIS control.

Gallagher criticized elected officials from both parties for putting their political careers over service to their country.

“I think both parties have often been guilty of increasing the power of the presidency and the legislative branch,” he said. “I fear we’re losing trust in the basic institutions of government across the board.”

“All the enemies we face, foreign and domestic, are symptoms of the same disease, and that’s a lack of leadership and moral courage from career politicians and unelected bureaucrats who care more about their careers than they do about the country,” Gallagher said.

“I’m an American first, a conservative and a Republican,” he said. “I took an oath 10 years ago to support the Constitution, not to serve a political party.”

Nevertheless, Gallagher said he supports GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump, in spite of political and philosophical differences, because he is the Republican nominee.

“I’m going to vote for our nominee,” he said.

“He’s tapped into a general frustration with the direction of the country, and that’s a large part of why I’m running,” he said.

Gallagher couldn’t say whether having Trump at the top of the ticket was a help or a hindrance.

“This is about the craziest political year that I can remember,” he said. “Getting the message out there is the only variable that I can control.”

Gallagher conceded that the message of the Republican Party is a little muddled these days.

“It’s difficult to discern what is the uniting philosophy behind the Republican Party right now,” he said.

Gallagher expressed differences with Trump on some key issues, including Trump’s statements that the U.S. could back away from its obligations to NATO.

“We shouldn’t be suggesting to Vladimir Putin that we are unwilling to hold up and honor our Article 5 commitments under NATO,” Gallagher said.

He said that’s one of other areas where he could disagree with the party.

“I suspect there will be many areas where I agree with people in our party and many where I disagree,” he said. “I’m not running to serve the Republican Party in Congress. I’m running to serve the people of the 8th District.”

Gallagher said he is hoping to provide an an alternative model for congressional service.

He said he would work to end government pensions that incentivize politicians to make their public service a career.

He also said he would introduce legislation to keep Congress from getting paid if it doesn’t pass a budget.

Gallagher also said he supports a balanced budget amendment.

Gallagher said the Republican Party needs to put forward an alternative to Obamacare rather than continually voting to repeal it.

“It’s not enough for Republicans to say, ‘Obamacare bad.’ We also need to articulate what a good alternative like that looks like that people can believe in,” he said.

Gallagher said his conservative values were the driving force of his campaign.

“I believe in conservative values as necessary to the future of the country,” he said. “I will not compromise those values or those principles.”

Gallagher is vying for the GOP nomination for the 8th Congressional District held for three terms by Reid Ribble, who recently came out against Donald Trump and said he would consider supporting the Libertarian ticket.

Ribble on Monday also endorsed Gallagher as his replacement saying he has the foreign policy experience, fundraising ability and status as a political outsider needed to mount a strong general election campaign.

Gallagher is facing Frank Lasee, of De Pere, and Terry McNulty, of Forestville, for the GOP nomination on Aug. 9.

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Public Record

Wed, 07/27/2016 - 10:33pm

Shawano Police Department

July 26

Police logged 20 incidents, including the following:

Arrest — A 37-year-old man was taken into custody at the probation and parole offices, 1340 E. Green Bay St.

Trespass — Police responded to a trespassing complaint in the 500 block of South Union Street.

Theft — A purse and jewelry were reported stolen in the 300 block of East Richmond Street.

Shawano County Sheriff’s Department

July 26

Deputies logged 42 incidents, including the following:

Trespass — Authorities responded to a trespassing complaint on County Road Y in the town of Belle Plaine.

Fraud — Authorities investigated a telephone scam complaint at North Star Casino, W12180 County Road A, Bowler.

Juvenile — Authorities responded to a juvenile problem on Hemlock Road in the town of Wittenberg.

OWI — A 34-year-old Keshena man was arrested for operating while intoxicated on state Highway 29 in the town of Maple Grove.

Disorderly — Authorities responded to a disorderly conduct complaint on First Street in Bonduel.

Accidents — Authorities responded to injury accidents on County Road C in the town of Green Valley and state Highway 47-55 in the town of Wescott.

Clintonville Police Department

July 26

Police logged 14 incidents, including the following:

Theft — A theft was reported on West 12th Street.

Harassment — Harassment was reported on Bennett Street.

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