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Updated: 25 min 4 sec ago

City held sensitivity training after Kohl complaint

Wed, 09/07/2016 - 7:28am
Session held for all department headsBy: 

Tim Ryan, [email protected]

The city of Shawano is defending itself and its police chief against two sex discrimination suits, but at least one of the complaints inspired a sensitivity training session earlier this year.

City Administrator Brian Knapp said all city department heads, including Kohl, participated in a training session that dealt with “perceptions and sensibilities.”

Knapp said he couldn’t recall the exact date, but said it was held in May or June.

That would have been after Police Department employee Laura Chartraw filed a complaint with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission accusing Kohl of sexual discrimination.

The EEOC found no evidence of wrongdoing in a conclusion rendered in March.

Knapp said he felt the training session “was something all of us can benefit from.”

However, he did link it to the complaint against Kohl.

“There was a correlation,” he said.

He said the city was “re-initiating” training and awareness programs in the wake of the EEOC complaint.

Knapp said there are comments that could be taken “in a way we don’t anticipate,” and said the training session was intended to help city employees to be more cognizant of that.

Chartraw subsequently filed a civil suit in federal court, naming Kohl and the city as defendants.

Police Officer NiCole Hoffmann filed suit against Kohl in May alleging sex discrimination for bypassing her and hiring a lower-ranked male applicant for a police officer vacancy in July 2014.

Kohl subsequently hired Hoffmann in January 2015, but her suit seeks damages for loss of past and future income.

The city is not named as a defendant in the Hoffmann case, but is covering the cost of defending both cases through its liability insurance.

Knapp said that’s because the Hoffmann suit alleges behavior by Kohl that was conducted in his capacity as a city employee.

There have been no changes to Kohl’s duties or responsibilities while the lawsuits are pending.

“The chief is responsible for managing the department,” he said.

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Public Record

Wed, 09/07/2016 - 7:27am

Shawano Police Department

Sept. 5

Police logged 19 incidents, including the following:

Suspicious — Police investigated a suspicious person complaint in the 100 block of South Washington Street.

Suspicious — Police investigated a suspicious person complaint in the 400 block of West Eagle Street.

Harassment — Police responded to a harassment complaint in the 300 block of North Lafayette Street.

Drug Offense — Police investigated a drug complaint at Green Bay Street and Woodlawn Drive.

Shawano County Sheriff’s Department

Sept. 5

Deputies logged 53 incidents, including the following:

Trespass — Authorities responded to a trespassing complaint on Lawn Road in the town of Maple Grove.

Disorderly — Authorities responded to a disorderly conduct complaint on Roosevelt Road in the town of Seneca.

Theft — Authorities investigated a property theft complaint on Lemke Street in Cecil.

Warrant — A 22-year-old man was taken into custody on a warrant on Wilderness Road in the town of Wittenberg.

OAR — A 23-year-old man was arrested for third-offense operating after revocation on Butternut Road in the town of Herman.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a disturbance on Green Valley Road in the town of Angelica.

Vandalism — A vehicle was reported vandalized at the Shawano County Fairgrounds, 900 E. Green Bay St., Shawano.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a domestic disturbance on Smalley Street in the town of Wescott.

Vandalism — A vehicle was reported vandalized on Nightingale Road in the town of Wittenberg.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a disturbance on Robin Road in the town of Wittenberg.

Accidents — Authorities responded to injury accidents in the town of Hartland and the town of Washington.

Clintonville Police Department

Sept. 5

Police logged six incidents, including the following:

Disorderly — Disorderly conduct was reported on Motor Street.

Theft — A trailer was reported stolen.

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Mold problem over at high school

Wed, 09/07/2016 - 7:25am
By: 

Leader Staff

Classes at Shawano Community High School returned to normal Tuesday after a mold cleanup in a cluster of classrooms.

Superintendent Gary Cumberland said tests showed that air quality had improved in classrooms where mold previously was found growing.

The mold problem was discovered when teachers returned from summer break in about a half-dozen classrooms used for art, music and band.

Classes were relocated temporarily starting on the first day of the new school year, as crews removed the mold and then tested the air quality.

After the three-day weekend, Cumberland said Tuesday that operations were returning to normal effective immediately.

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Fair weather more than fair

Mon, 09/05/2016 - 8:33pm
Shawano event gets six good daysBy: 

Scott Williams, [email protected]


Leader Photo by Scott Williams Getting a close look at goats Monday at the Shawano County Fair are Skylar Lanphear, 3, left, and her brother, Jaxson Lanphear, 2, both of Shawano.
Leader Photo by Scott Williams Fans pack into the Shawano Speedway grandstands Monday for a demolition derby on the closing day of the Shawano County Fair.

Just about anyone who turned out for the Shawano County Fair this year would have to agree that the real grand champion was the weather.

Six consecutive days with pleasantly mild temperatures and scarcely a drop of rain created a nearly postcard-perfect setting for the annual exhibition on the fairgrounds in Shawano.

Good weather was credited with attracting robust crowds, keeping livestock in better spirits and creating a mellow atmosphere that led to fewer problems among fairgoers.

Missy Braun, organizer of the Barnyard Olympics, said rather than running from the rain or finding someplace to beat the heat, she found herself relaxing and spending more time than usual at the fair.

“This has been perfect,” Braun said as she and others enjoyed one last day on the fairgrounds before the fair ended its six-day run Monday.

No attendance figures were available yet, although organizers said they expected to see greater turnout than last year.

Dan Zernicke, chairman of the livestock committee for the fair, said the crowds were especially large on Saturday night, largely because of the pleasant weather.

Saying he could not recall another year when Mother Nature delivered such ideal conditions, Zernicke said he was happy to see so many people enjoying themselves at the fair.

“That’s what we do this all for,” he said. “We’ve got to put on a show for the people.”

Betty Gast, co-superintendent of the rabbit and poultry barn, said caring for the many animals involved in the county fair is much easier when a breeze is blowing through the barns and temperatures are in the 70s.

“It’s been really great for the animals’ comfort — and for ours, too,” Gast said.

With the serious livestock judging events finished, the six-day exhibition of farm lifestyle, industry and culture culminated Monday in one final outburst of fun and laughter. A human crowing contest was followed by a demolition derby, a horse show and the Barnyard Olympics.

Alvin Styczysnki and his polka band entertained, while fairgoers lined the midway enjoying cold beer and other refreshments.

Although the sky was partly cloudy Monday, patrons said they could not remember another county fair with such remarkable weather day after day.

“The weather’s been perfect this year,” said Nancy Netzel, of Matteson. “This one has been one of the best fairs weather-wise.”

Big crowds turned out and filled the grandstands for both the demolition derby and the horse show on the fair’s final day.

Sylvia Zimdars, volunteer at the Leopolis Fish & Game Club beer stand, said she has grown accustomed to having at least one day disrupted by rain during the fair. The good weather seemed to make it possible, Zimdars said, for people to slow down, be more relaxed and stay longer.

“It just seems better,” she said. “People are in a better mood when the weather’s nice. I know I am.”

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Public Record

Mon, 09/05/2016 - 8:19pm

Shawano Police Department

Sept. 4

Police logged 27 incidents, including the following:

Disturbance — Police responded to a disturbance in the 100 block of South Main Street.

Disorderly — Police responded to an intoxicated person complaint in the 200 block of South Union Street.

Accident — Police responded to a minor property damage accident at Walmart, 1244 E. Green Bay St.

Theft — Police investigated a theft complaint in the 800 block of Olson Street.

Sept. 3

Police logged 23 incidents, including the following:

Disturbance — Police responded to a disturbance in the 100 block of South Lafayette Street.

Disturbance — Police responded to a disturbance in the 600 block of East Division Street.

Disorderly — Police responded to an intoxicated person complaint in the 100 block of South Main Street.

Shoplifting — Walmart, 1244 E. Green Bay St., reported a juvenile male shoplifter in custody.

Theft — Two Playstations were reported stolen in the 100 block of South Smalley Street.

Sept. 2

Police logged 30 incidents, including the following:

Theft — Clothes were reported stolen from the Martin’s Cleaners laundromat at 1025 E. Green Bay St.

Disturbance — Police responded to a disturbance at ThedaCare Medical Center, 100 County Road B.

Disturbance — Police responded to a disturbance in the 100 block of South Smalley Street.

Drug Offense — Police investigated a drug complaint in the 200 block of Teddington Lane.

Shoplifting — Walmart, 1244 E. Green Bay St., reported a male shoplifter had fled the store.

Theft — A wallet was reported stolen at Family Dollar, 413 S. Main St.

Disturbance — Police responded to a disturbance in the 100 block of South Lafayette Street.

Shawano County Sheriff’s Department

Sept. 4

Deputies logged 41 incidents, including the following:

Disorderly — Authorities responded to a disorderly conduct complaint on Rustic Drive in the town of Belle Plaine.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a disturbance on Lake Drive in the town of Wescott.

Harassment — Authorities responded to a harassment complaint on Howard Street in Wittenberg.

Trespass — Authorities responded to a trespassing complaint on First Street in Aniwa.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a disturbance at the Shawano County Fairgrounds, 900 E. Green Bay St., Shawano.

Disorderly — Authorities responded to a disorderly conduct complaint at the Shawano County Fairgrounds, 900 E. Green Bay St., Shawano.

Sept. 3

Deputies logged 49 incidents, including the following:

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a disturbance on Webb Street in Wittenberg.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a disturbance on County Road MMM in the town of Richmond.

Drug Offense — Authorities investigated a drug complaint at the Ho Chunk Casino, N7198 U.S. Highway 45, in the town of Wittenberg.

Theft — Authorities responded to a property theft complaint on Whippoorwill Road in the town of Birnamwood.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a disturbance on Willow Road in the town of Wittenberg.

Vandalism — Authorities responded to a vandalism complaint on County Road Z in the town of Herman.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a domestic disturbance on Buss Drive in the town of Washington.

Accident — Authorities responded to a fatal crash on Willow Creek Road in the town of Herman and an injury accident on County Road N in the town of Birnamwood.

Sept. 2

Deputies logged 53 incidents, including the following:

Suspicious — Authorities responded to a suspicious person complaint on Knoke Street in Gresham.

Suspicious — Authorities responded to a suspicious person complaint on Elm Road in the town of Green Valley.

Trespass — Authorities responded to a trespassing complaint on National Guard Road in Bowler.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a disturbance on Sandy Drive in the town of Washington.

OWI — A 47-year-old man was arrested for operating while intoxicated on state Highway 29 in the town of Richmond.

Accidents — Authorities logged seven accidents, including an injury accident on state Highway 29 in the town of Belle Plaine and three deer-related crashes.

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18-year-old killed in crash

Mon, 09/05/2016 - 7:43am
By: 

Leader Staff

An 18-year-old Shawano man as killed Saturday night when he crashed his pickup truck into a tree in the town of Herman, according to the Shawano County Sheriff’s Department.

Authorities were called to the scene just before 9 p.m. by a passing motorist who reported that a vehicle ran off the road at the intersection of Willow Creek Road and County Road U and that a person was laying next to the vehicle.

Sheriff’s deputies and the Wisconsin State Patrol along with the Shawano County Sheriff’s Department responded.

The preliminary investigation indicates the driver of the pickup truck lost control of his vehicle, over-corrected and hit a tree, according to authorities.

The sheriff’s department also said the 18-year-old was the sole occupant and was not wearing a seat belt.

He was pronounced dead at the scene. His name was being withheld pending notification of the family.

The Wisconsin State Patrol is investigating the crash.

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Fair’s ‘best kept secret’ not so secret anymore

Mon, 09/05/2016 - 7:42am
Horse shows drawing bigger crowds each yearBy: 

Tim Ryan, [email protected]


Leader Photo by Tim Ryan Jenna Arens celebrates her 11th birthday by taking part in the halter class competition at the Junior Horse Show, showing off her horse’s walking and trotting skills Sunday at the Crawford Center during the Shawano County Fair.
Leader Photo by Tim Ryan Jionna Holewinski gets a little help from mom, Kelly, as she shows off her spring heifer calf, also named Jionna, at the Shawano County Fair’s open dairy show Sunday.

This was the first year since 2006 that John Arens could just sit back and enjoy the horse show at the Shawano County Fair rather than having to worry about whether it came off as planned.

He handed the reins this year over to Diane Schnell, the horse key committee chair. Schnell has been active in the program for several years and is also the drill team coach

Still, Arens had a strong personal interest in the outcome of this year’s event, given that his daughter, Jenna, was participating.

On Sunday, which was also Jenna’s 11th birthday, she showed off her horse’s walking and trotting skills in the halter pony class at the Junior Horse Show competition, riding a gelding slightly older than she is.

She was among 24 participants in the junior horse show class.

“I feel very relaxed. It’s fun,” Arens said, sitting in a shady spot outside the horse arena near the announcer’s booth Sunday.

Arens watched his oldest daughter go through nine years of this program, and was now watching Jenna compete.

“As a dad, it’s rewarding,” she said.

The horse shows at Crawford Center continue to be called “the fair’s best kept secret,” even though attendance rises every year.

Arens said he was pleased with this year’s turnout, which he said was probably helped by the mild weather.

“Weather like this, it does nothing but help the fair,” he said. “It’s a great show, and I think everyone involved over here with the horse project just does a wonderful job.”

The equine events take place at the other end of the fairgrounds, away from the midway, the grandstand and the livestock competitions, in what is commonly called “Shawano County Fair East.”

“We’re the eastern side of the Shawano County Fair,” Schnell said. “We try to get people coming because we have signs all over the fairgrounds to try and point them this way.”

Some 40 different classes of horses are shown during the fair — including miniature ponies, donkeys, mules and draught horses.

Schnell said the riders work with their horses all year round, which she said, is a difference between the horse project and a lot of the livestock projects.

“A lot of these horses have been shown for multiple years, and they get better every year,” she said. “It’s ongoing.”

The horses are handled pretty much every day, Schnell said.

“There’s a huge bond that’s created between the kids and their animals,” she said. “And it’s a lifelong bond because many horses live quite a few years. So it becomes a really huge pet.”

Horses are also handled more gently than can sometimes be seen in livestock projects, where more aggressive tactics are often required to get the animals to go through the necessary paces.

“It’s about persuading a 1,200-pound animal to do what they need to do,” Schnell said. “When you think about how the cowboys spent 24/7 with their horses — that’s what makes that relationship, and it’s the same with the 4-H members and their horses.

“You can’t just push them around and make them do things. You have to get their trust, get their respect, and do it that way.”

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Shawano County Fair Schedule

Sat, 09/03/2016 - 7:43am

Saturday, Sept. 3

Events

9 a.m.: Junior class dairy cattle show, Coliseum; open class horse show, including junior dressage and jumping competitions, Crawford Center; open and junior poultry and poultry products show, Small Animal Building

11 a.m.-8 p.m.: Classic car show, Crawford Center

Entertainment

1-4 p.m.: Polka Dynamics, President’s Park

2 and 4 p.m.: Magic Matt’s Family Fun Show, Junior Building Stage

6 p.m.: Stock Car Races Championship Night, Grandstand

8:30 p.m.: Adam Trask Band, under the grandstand; Neal Zunker, President’s Park

Activities

11 a.m.: Kiddie tractor pull, noon start

12-11 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides; $1.50 per ride from noon to 5 p.m.

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Sunday, Sept. 4

Events

9 a.m.: Gates open; open class dairy show, Coliseum; junior class horse show, Crawford Center

10 a.m.: Protestant church service, under the grandstand

11 a.m.: Polka Mass, President’s Park

11 a.m.-8 p.m.: Classic Car Show, Crawford Center

Noon: Dairy Pee Wee showmanship class, Coliseum

Entertainment

1 p.m.: Tag Races, Trailer Races and Spectator Eliminators, Grandstand

1-5 p.m.: Jerry Voelker, President’s Park

2, 4:30 and 6:30 p.m.: Magic Matt’s Family Fun Show, Junior Building Stage

7-10 p.m.: TNT Polka, President’s Park

8:30 p.m.: Johnny Wad, under the grandstand

Activities

12-11 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Monday, Sept. 5

Events

9 a.m.: Gates open; rooster crowing contests followed by a chicken flying contest and human crowing contest, Coliseum

10 a.m.: Poultry, rabbit and goat auction, Coliseum

11 a.m. to 8 p.m.: Classic car show, Crawford Center

Entertainment

10:30 a.m.: 4-H drill team performance, Crawford Center

11 a.m.: Fun day horse games, Crawford Center

12 and 1:30 p.m.: Magic Matt’s Family Fun Show, Junior Building Stage

1 p.m.: Demolition derby, Grandstand

1-4 p.m.: Alvin Styczynski, President’s Park

Activities

12-6 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

1-3 p.m.: FFA Olympics, Coliseum

5 p.m. Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

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Livestock auction fair’s ‘big event of the year’

Sat, 09/03/2016 - 7:42am
Bidders show support for farm kidsBy: 

Scott Williams, [email protected]


Leader Photo by Scott Williams Luis Valenzuela of the Caroline Aces 4-H Club shows his 300-pound swine for sale during Friday’s livestock auction at the Shawano County Fair.
Leader Photo by Scott Williams Auctioneer Leonard Yoap keeps the action moving Friday during the fast-paced livestock auction at the Shawano County Fair.

Kids auctioned off their prized livestock for big paydays Friday during the frenzied excitement and competition of the annual livestock sale at the Shawano County Fair.

Bidders and spectators packed inside the Coliseum for a virtual parade of the biggest and best beef, swine and sheep that area 4-H and FFA club members produced this year.

Hundreds of people filled the arena to standing-room-only status, as auctioneers called out for offers from bidders competing to purchase the high-quality livestock.

“It’s a very exciting night,” said Jamie Patton, the University of Wisconsin-Extension agriculture agent for Shawano County.

Patton said the number of animals registered for auction had increased to 141 — nine more than last year — and the judges who selected grand champions and other winners were extremely impressed by the quality of livestock presented in Shawano County this year.

“It’s a beautiful year,” she said.

The grand champion animals this year:

• A 1,389-pound beef cow entered by Deanna Zernicke of the Bonduel FFA.

• A 1,436-pound dairy cow entered by Trevor Stewart of the Tiger Tribe 4-H Club.

• A 271-pound swine entered by Logan Harbaugh of the County Line 4-H Club.

• A 154-pound sheep entered by Megan Zeitler of the Landstad 4-H Club.

The auction was expected to continue for three hours Friday night before all 141 kids had a chance to present their animals and hope for a robust payday — the culmination of several months of work for them raising and grooming their animals for county fair competition.

Mason Jauquet, a senior at Pulaski High School, was delighted that his 285-pound swine brought a bid $8.75 per pound, for a total price of nearly $2,500. Jauquet said that was more than he has ever fetched before, including a few years ago when he had a grand champion hog.

Jauquet, who said the money would support his future college education, said the auction is about more than just money to him. He said agricultural work is a passion to him, and he values mostly the validation and acknowledgement that he has done a good job.

“I put a lot of hard work into this,” he said. “It’s showing me that my hard work pays off.”

Bidders active in the auction included Charlie’s County Market, Maplewood Meats, Festival Foods, Riesterer & Schnell and Witt Family Ford, along with many others. The bidding got pretty intense at times, although the bidders mostly were having fun and showing support for the 4-H and FFA kids.

More than once, winning bidders donated their animals back to be auctioned again, with the additional proceeds benefiting the livestock show’s college scholarship program.

Bonnie Kaczmarowski, of Pulaski, cheered for her daughter, Brooke, 13, who netted $1,725 for a 300-pound swine that she worked hard to raise herself. Kaczmarowski said the money probably would go toward college or a car for Brooke in a few years.

Kaczmarowski said her daughter enters livestock and other projects at the county fair every year. The livestock auction is one of the family’s favorite events.

“It’s pretty much a highlight of the fair for us,” she said. “It’s the big event of the year.”

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Stockbridge-Munsee break ground on retail center

Sat, 09/03/2016 - 7:29am
Exterior work expected to be finished by end of the yearBy: 

Lee Pulaski, [email protected]


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski This piece of land next to the Shell 22 convenience store, owned by the Stockbridge-Munsee Tribe, will house a new 12,000 square-foot retail center. Exterior work is expected to be finished by year’s end, and the search for tenants has begun.
Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Stockbridge-Munsee Tribal President Shannon Holsey, center, is flanked by tribal council members Scott Vele and Jo Ann Schedler as they shovel the first clumps of dirt Friday at the site of a future retail center. The tribe is pouring $1.3 million into the project and hopes to attract business to the busy junction of state Highways 22 and 29.

The Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Indians broke ground Friday on a shopping center at the junction of state Highways 22 and 29 and hope to have it ready for tenants by the end of 2016.

Tribal council members joined with county and state officials in shoveling the first clumps of dirt on the $1.3 million project that has been years in the making. The tribe purchased the land next to the Shell 22 convenience store in 2004, but other priorities, such as work on the North Star Casino — the tribe’s primary revenue source — and a new health and wellness center, took priority.

“We had a plan, and this was the next step to our strategic plan,” Stockbridge-Munsee Tribal President Shannon Holsey said.

Holsey said Bayland Buildings, the Green Bay-based general contractor, plans to have the building’s shell completed in less than four months. The tribe plans to immediately market the property to prospective tenants and then make interior modifications based on the retailer’s needs.

“It’s going to be very impressive,” Holsey said. “We anticipate starting construction immediately.”

The project is not the first Stockbridge-Munsee foray into retail, according to Holsey. She noted that the tribe also operates Tractor Supply in Shawano.

“Economic diversification does not always necessitate being on the reservation,” Holsey said. “It’s also being good stewards to Shawano County because we are citizens of Shawano County, but we are also the largest employer in the county.”

County Supervisor Arlyn Tober praised the project after the groundbreaking, seeing it as a good project for the tribe and county, as well as the town of Belle Plaine and city of Shawano.

“It doesn’t look very good right now,” Tober said of the property, a sunken valley with few trees and an abundance of wild grass, “but it’s supposed to look really amazing once it’s developed. You can see the amount of traffic right now just with the gas station, and that can only improve.”

State Rep. Gary Tauchen, R-Bonduel, also attended the ceremony and was excited about the number of new jobs the retail center would bring to the area. The tribe estimates 15 to 20 jobs for the construction phase, but did not estimate how many jobs would come from new businesses.

“Hopefully it will stimulate the economy in this area and be the start of something that will expand in this area,” Tauchen said.

Holsey said it was important for the tribe to buy land in Shawano County and be economically diverse in tending to the needs of the tribal community. She noted that there is not a lot of retail business on Highway 29 between Wausau and Green Bay, and she hopes the new center will bring more businesses to the corridor.

“This retail center will bring new jobs and increased shopping activity to the Belle Plaine and Shawano areas,” Belle Plaine Town Chairman Alvin Bartz said in a press released provided by the tribe. “We expect this will spur other developments in the area and we applaud the Stockbridge-Munsee Mohican Tribe for their continued investment in the local communities surrounding their tribal lands.”

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Local Harley dealer to compete in cross-country race

Sat, 09/03/2016 - 7:26am
Hopkins using 1916 motorcycleBy: 

Tim Ryan, [email protected]


Contributed Photo Stephen “Doc” Hopkins, with Dawn Hamilton in the sidecar, will compete in a 3,300-mile, cross-country endurance race that starts in Atlantic City, New Jersey, next weekend. The bike is a 1916 Harley-Davidson.

Stephen “Doc” Hopkins, of Doc’s Harley-Davidson in Bonduel, and his girlfriend, Dawn Hamilton, have spent most of the last two years preparing for the trip they’ll be embarking on Tuesday.

It was about two years ago that Hopkins learned he had been selected to participate in the 2016 Motorcycle Cannonball Race, a historic endurance contest that will take them from the boardwalk in Atlantic City, New Jersey, to Carlsbad, California, more than 3,300 miles away.

In order to qualify for the race, riders must participate on a motorcycle that is at least 100 years old, and Hopkins will be riding his 1916 Harley-Davidson, with Hamilton along in the sidecar.

Hopkins said it was “quite special” to have been selected.

“It’s been a lifetime dream,” Hamilton said, adding she felt “very excited and very nervous” about the trip.

Slots in the race are typically reserved for riders who have run the race before, but there was an opening for this year’s event.

Hamilton sent in an audition video that, Hopkins said, “showed them what we do and how we do things over here.”

Apparently, race organizers were impressed.

“They said, ‘You guys might be interesting,” Hopkins said.

The couple has been working for two years getting the 100-year-old bike in shape.

“For something that old, it’s hard to find parts for,” Hopkins said.

Upgrades to the motorcycle were allowed up to a point, he said, but much of it — including the original frame, crank case and transmission — still remain.

Rules allowed Hopkins to add a slightly updated carburetor, provided it was manufactured no later than the 1930s.

He was also allowed to put in a front brake, something that didn’t exist on the 1916 model.

Hopkins also added a few other touches, including a windshield for the sidecar, a wicker basket for Dawn’s make-up case and a hot dog-cooker on the exhaust pipe.

The bike is also engraved with the names of Hopkins’ and Hamilton’s friends and family, and with the names of some noteworthy racers Hopkins has known over the years.

“We’re taking them along with us,” he said.

The couple will depart Doc’s Harley-Davidson on Tuesday. The bike will be transported to Atlantic City via trailer.

Hopkins plans to dip his rear tire in the Atlantic Ocean and collect a vial of sand before the race begins on Sept. 10.

It wraps up Sept. 25 in Carlsbad, where Hopkins plans to dip his front tire in the Pacific and get another vial of sand there.

The couple will travel between 200 and 300 miles per day, with each day having a mileage quota they will have to meet or lose points.

Hamilton said the motorcycle could easily do 60 mph, though rules require a limit of 45-50 mph.

Vehicles are not allowed to follow the bikes along the route — which will take them through hot deserts and cold mountains — so if anything goes wrong along the way, they’ll be stuck waiting for a ride.

That’s one of the realities they had to consider in preparing the bike.

“You’ve got to look at what can happen,” Hopkins said.

Hopkins will be riding one of 89 bikes taking part in the race.

There is no money or trophy for the winner; “just bragging rights,” Hopkins said.

Hopkins has over 50 years of experience working with motorcycles and was involved in motorcycle drag racing for 40 years.

He is also known worldwide for his achievements in building some of the most unusual motorcycles to have ever graced the highways.

He is the creator of the world famous Timeline Motorcycle, built in 2009. The Timeline Motorcycle is powered by seven different Harley-Davidson engines, each from a different era of Harley-Davidson history.

ONLINE

Follow Doc Hopkins’ journey on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Docsmotorcyclecannonballjourney2016/. For information, visit www.motorcyclecannonball.com.

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Public Record

Sat, 09/03/2016 - 7:22am

Shawano Police Department

Sept. 1

Police logged 33 incidents, including the following:

OWI — A 37-year-old man was arrested for operating while intoxicated at Franklin and Richmond streets.

Shoplifting — Walmart, 1244 E. Green Bay St., reported a shoplifting incident.

Fire — Police assisted at a vehicle fire at Lieg Avenue and Waukechon Street.

Disturbance — ThedaCare Medical Center-Shawano, 100 County Road B, reported an unruly patient.

Accident — A boy on a bicycle was struck be a vehicle at Lieg Avenue and Union Street. No injuries were reported. The boy and the driver both left the scene.

Arrest — A 29-year-old man was taken into custody at the probation and parole offices, 1340 E. Green Bay St.

Fraud — People’s Express South, 716 S. Main St., reported a counterfeit bill.

Accident — Police responded to a two-vehicle property damage accident at Green Bay Street and Rusch Road.

Shawano County Sheriff’s Department

Sept. 1

Deputies logged 48 incidents, including the following:

Disturbance — ThedaCare Medical Center-Shawano, 100 County Road B, reported an unruly patient.

Fraud — Authorities investigated an identity theft complaint on Lake Drive in the town of Wescott.

Burglary — A burglary was reported on County Road N in the town of Aniwa.

Juvenile — Authorities responded to a juvenile problem on Stony Curve Road in the town of Bartelme.

Burglary — A burglary was reported on Mission Street in Wittenberg.

Assault — Authorities investigated an assault complaint at the Shawano County fairgrounds, 900 E. Green Bay St., in Shawano.

Clintonville Police Department

Sept. 1

Police logged eight incidents, including the following:

Theft — Theft from a vehicle was reported on Waupaca Street.

Trespass — Police responded to a trespassing complaint on Sixth Street.

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Clintonville introduces Adopt a Park program

Sat, 09/03/2016 - 7:17am
By: 

Grace Kirchner, Leader Correspondent

Local organizations, businesses and individuals are invited to adopt a park in Clintonville.

Mayor Lois Bressette said the purpose of the Adopt a Park program is to help preserve, beautify and protect the city parks through community partnerships.

Bressette told the park and recreation committee Tuesday that there are people in the city eager to join the program.

“People are interested now,” she said. “We can’t wait till the snow starts flying, or they won’t do it.”

The city would like participating groups to make a commitment to adopt a park for at least one year.

The parks range in size from 27 acres to as little as a half acre.

Parks that are available for adoption are W.A. Olen Park, Bucholtz Park, Seven Maples Nature Area, Pigeon Lake wayside, Pickerel Point Memorial Park/Picnic Point, Fairway Lake neighborhood playground, Olen neighborhood playground, Rohrer Park, Pigeon River walkway, Veterans Memorial site, Shore Drive neighborhood playground, Gordy Noren Memorial Park, icehouse landing/boat launch facility, Hillside Drive Park, and Pickerel Point and neighborhood playground.

Maintenance efforts could include picking up litter, removing graffiti, doing small-scale gardening and landscaping, sweeping walkways, planting trees, painting and making small-scale projects.

The parks and recreation department will provide garbage bag lines, tools such as hoes, brooms, shovels and rakes, paint and paint brushes, and vinyl gloves.

Incentives and rewards will be provided for program participants.

Applications are available at City Hall, 50 10th St. For information, call Justin McAuly, parks and recreation director, at 715-250-0216.

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Shawano County Fair Schedule

Fri, 09/02/2016 - 7:33am

Friday, Sept. 2

Events

9 a.m.: Open and junior rabbit show, Small Animal Building; open and junior sheep show and pee wee showmanship class, Coliseum; open and junior dairy and meat goat show, Coliseum

11 a.m. to 8 p.m.: Classic car show, Crawford Center

3 p.m.: Horse trail class, horse barns; open and junior class exotic domestic animal show, Coliseum

5 p.m.: Decorated cake auction

6:30 p.m.: Market animal auction of beef, swine and sheep

Entertainment

1-5 p.m.: Roger’s Polka Party, President’s Park

7 p.m.: Shawano Speedway Enduro Race, Grandstand

7-11 p.m.: Chad Przybylski, President’s Park

7:30 p.m.: Led West, under the Grandstand

Activities

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5-10 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Saturday, Sept. 3

Events

9 a.m.: Junior class dairy cattle show, Coliseum; open class horse show, including junior dressage and jumping competitions, Crawford Center; open and junior poultry and poultry products show, Small Animal Building

11 a.m.-8 p.m.: Classic car show, Crawford Center

Entertainment

1-4 p.m.: Polka Dynamics, President’s Park

2 and 4 p.m.: Magic Matt’s Family Fun Show, Junior Building Stage

6 p.m.: Stock Car Races Championship Night, Grandstand

8:30 p.m.: Adam Trask Band, under the grandstand; Neal Zunker, President’s Park

Activities

11 a.m.: Kiddie tractor pull, noon start

12-11 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides; $1.50 per ride from noon to 5 p.m.

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Sunday, Sept. 4

Events

9 a.m.: Gates open; open class dairy show, Coliseum; junior class horse show, Crawford Center

10 a.m.: Protestant church service, under the grandstand

11 a.m.: Polka Mass, President’s Park

11 a.m.-8 p.m.: Classic Car Show, Crawford Center

Noon: Dairy Pee Wee showmanship class, Coliseum

Entertainment

1 p.m.: Tag Races, Trailer Races and Spectator Eliminators, Grandstand

1-5 p.m.: Jerry Voelker, President’s Park

2, 4:30 and 6:30 p.m.: Magic Matt’s Family Fun Show, Junior Building Stage

7-10 p.m.: TNT Polka, President’s Park

8:30 p.m.: Johnny Wad, under the grandstand

Activities

12-11 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

5 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

9 p.m.: Cosmic Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

Monday, Sept. 5

Events

9 a.m.: Gates open; rooster crowing contests followed by a chicken flying contest and human crowing contest, Coliseum

10 a.m.: Poultry, rabbit and goat auction, Coliseum

11 a.m. to 8 p.m.: Classic car show, Crawford Center

Entertainment

10:30 a.m.: 4-H drill team performance, Crawford Center

11 a.m.: Fun day horse games, Crawford Center

12 and 1:30 p.m.: Magic Matt’s Family Fun Show, Junior Building Stage

1 p.m.: Demolition derby, Grandstand

1-4 p.m.: Alvin Styczynski, President’s Park

Activities

12-6 p.m.: Rainbow Valley Rides

12:30 p.m.: Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

1-3 p.m.: FFA Olympics, Coliseum

5 p.m. Bingo, north side of fairgrounds

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Choose to Move is about having fun for a good cause

Fri, 09/02/2016 - 7:31am
Participation down, but spirits upBy: 

Brady Van Deurzen, [email protected]


Leader Photo by Greg Mellis Lily Guenther, 10, runs alongside her father, Joe Guenther, in the second annual Choose to Move 5K run/walk Thursday at the Shawano County Fair. Guenther was the first female to finish, with a time of 23 minutes, 12 seconds.

The second annual Choose to Move 5K run/walk sponsored by the Rural Health Initiate went off without a hitch Thursday night at the Shawano County Fairgrounds.

Although the number of participants dropped from 92 last year to 41 this year, Rhonda Strebel, RHI executive director, said the event was a success.

“This event is all about being an inclusive, fun 5K run/walk,” Strebel said. “If the runners or walkers had a fun time, then we succeeded.”

Flo Withers, 84, said she enjoyed spending time walking with friends.

“Just to be able to walk around with people is so much fun,” Withers said. “I’d hate to walk all by myself, and here, I don’t have to, I have a nice crowd with me.”

Robyn Shingler, of Shawano, volunteered to help at the event for a second time.

“The Rural Health Initiative is a wonderful cause and I think that it’s something that will catch fire,” Shingler said. “I think that it’s doing a beautiful job an reminding people of the cool amenities that the area has. Helping this initiative is a no-brainer and I wish I could do more to help.”

Being a runner, Shingler considered competing rather than working.

“I would have loved to run in this, but I run all the time, and this is such a great cause that I wanted to help instead,” she said.

Bruce Scheller, of Manawa, posted the event’s best time (19 minutes, 56 seconds).

“I’m a dairy farmer myself, and being that this run was hosted by the Rural Health Initiative, I mean why not?” he said.

Strebel said RHI values its partnership with the fair.

“They have been very supportive of us and have really helped make this work,” she said. “They have provided us with a lot of supplies to allow us to do all of this, and they have just been great partners, and they understand our tie to agricultural too and that we want to support our local farmers.”

The run/walk raised about $1,700 for RHI.

Rural Health Initiative Inc. describes itself as a nonprofit program focused on the growing concerns and barriers related to the health and safety of today’s farm families. Health coordinators make free -in-home visits to farmer and agribusinesses to provide health screenings, offer health coaching, and refer clients to community resources.

Choose to Move

Results

12 and under: 1. Lily Guenther 23:12, 2. Josiah Kuehl 25:08

13-19: 1. Bethany Krewlow 25:14, 2. Allison Stewart 33:08

20-29: 1. Andrea Michonski 46:38, 2. Brianna Olson 46:38

30-39: 1. Liz Conradt 24:32, 2. Julie Relhofer 24:52

40-49: 1. Joe Guenther 23:12, 2. Jeff Ballwahn 33:08

50-59: 1. Bruce Scheller 19:56, 2. Bryan Gagnow 24:03

60 and over: 1. Mary Ann Liefke 40:43, 2. Bonnie Olson 46:38

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Approval of Airbnb will be reconsidered

Fri, 09/02/2016 - 7:28am
Conditional use permit restriction not allowedBy: 

Tim Ryan, [email protected]

A bed-and-breakfast business model gaining popularity across the country but new to the city of Shawano was recommended for approval by the plan commission Wednesday, but it turns out the recommendation will have to go back for reconsideration next month.

Assistant City Administrator Eddie Sheppard said a new public hearing will have to be held on a request for a conditional use permit to allow an Airbnb at a residence at 420 River Heights.

Airbnb is an online marketplace that enables people to list, fin, and then rent vacation space for a processing fee. The privately owned and operated company was founded in August 2008 and is headquartered in San Francisco.

The Airbnb marketplace connects hosts and travelers via its website.

Though referred to as a bed-and-breakfast, there’s actually no breakfast involved. Many of the bookings involve out-of-towners needing a place to spend the night.

James and Deborah Lonick had been running an Airbnb at their home on River Heights for several months before learning the operation required a conditional use permit.

Several of the Lonicks’ neighbors, however, told the commission they were opposed to a business operation in their residential district.

A chief concern was not so much with the Lonicks, but a conditional use permit attached to the property that could be passed down to new owners in the future.

Sheppard said Thursday he gave the plan commission incorrect information when he said commissioners could attach a condition to the permit that would restrict it to the Lonicks.

He said he since learned that such a condition would be in conflict with the city’s ordinance and would not be allowed.

There was no legal counsel at Wednesday’s meeting to address that question.

Sheppard said he couldn’t in good conscience pass the commission’s recommendation on to the Common Council for approval due to the misunderstanding.

Instead, the commission will hold a new public hearing on Oct. 5.

The Lonicks are proposing to make available a small studio apartment overlooking the river, with a maximum occupancy of three people, based on Airbnb guidelines.

Deborah Lonick said she and her husband, who have traveled and stayed in Airbnb’s elsewhere, decided to make their home available after their three children, now adults, moved out.

She said experiences at those accommodations had been wonderful and that the Shawano location would be unique.

“Shawano is a friendly place in the world where the world is a little bit hostile, ” she said. “Ours is a sanctuary, a quiet place.”

She added that parties, pets and children are not allowed.

James Lonick said the Airbnb would draw people who would otherwise not come to Shawano.

“These are people who would not come to Shawano unless it was Airbnb network,” he said. “They’re not going to stay in one of the hotels in town. This is a different kind of person. They’re quiet, nice people.”

Lonick noted that guests are background-checked by Airbnb, just as the Lonicks were to be able to offer the space.

The Lonicks offered their home as an Airbnb site in June and July before being informed by the city that a conditional use permit was required.

They provided the commission with signatures from neighbors who were unopposed to the idea.

However, one of their neighbors, Sam Santacroce, said he was concerned that a business operation in the residential neighborhood could decrease the value of his property.

“I don’t think this is the place for just the third bed-and-breakfast in Shawano,” he said.

The city has issued special exceptions for two other traditional bed-and-breakfast operations, though only one — located at Franklin and Green Bay streets — followed through by operating one.

Several bed-and-breakfasts are in operation outside the city limits in the town of Wescott.

Fred Crook, another neighbor, had good words for the Lonicks, but reservations about the Airbnb.

“I consider the Lonicks an above average neighbor, an above average property,” he said. “I would be happy to let them have the permit. I would have no objection at all because I know they would handle that great, but this passing (the conditional use permit) on to the next person concerns me because we have no idea how that person is going to handle it.”

Plan commission member Robyn Shingler said she has stayed at Airbnb properties and has always had a good experience.

“This is new to Shawano, but it’s certainly not unusual at all to have an Airbnb property today, ” she said. “The fact that we’re taking it up and this is our first experience is what I guess is unusual.”

She said even if the commission denied the request, others would eventually come along.

Shingler said, however, that the potential of transferring the conditional use to new property owners was a concern.

Commission member Chad Kary said the Airbnb represented a new business model that the city should embrace.

“This is the new economy,” he said. “People travel in this way now. We have an opportunity to say we’re friendly to this kind of business.”

Kary said he realized some people don’t like having things in their backyard, but, he said, “I don’t see this as one of those negatives that we necessarily need to keep out of our backyard.”

The recommendation for approval passed on a 6-2 vote, with Tim Schultz and Dick Felts voting against. Both had raised concern about setting a precedent for business operations in residential districts.

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Lake treatment results look positive

Fri, 09/02/2016 - 7:23am
Tests show invasive plant down 90 percentBy: 

Scott Williams, [email protected]

Destructive plants clogging the waters of Shawano Lake are in retreat after large-scale herbicide treatments designed to clear the lake for better boating, fishing and swimming.

Early test results show that chemical applications carried out this summer have reduced by more than 90 percent the lake’s main targeted invasive plant species.

Officials caution that more testing is needed, but they are encouraged by preliminary indications that the herbicide worked even better than anticipated in improving water quality.

“All signs point to a successful treatment,” said Eddie Heath, an ecologist on the project with the consulting firm Onterra LLC.

Water samples collected from the 6,000-acre lake before and after the chemical treatments, Heath said, show that infestation of the invasive plant species known as Eurasian Water Milfoil has been reduced from affecting 17 percent of the lake to slightly more than 1 percent.

Test results also show minimal damage caused by the herbicide to native plant species that lake advocates hope will flourish once the invasive plants are out of the way.

Ray Zuelke, a board member of the group called Shawano Area Waterways Management, said the water is visibly cleaner since the chemical applications, and he believes the lake’s ecological system is healthier than ever.

“It’s incredible,” he said. “I never dreamed we could make it this good.”

Zuelke’s group of lakefront property owners and other lake boosters spearheaded the herbicide program after seeing the Eurasian Water Milfoil and other destructive plants grow so thick and large in Shawano Lake that they could snag motorboats and impede fish populations.

With a permit from the state Department of Natural Resources, the group combined $200,000 in state funds with $235,000 in private donations to conduct the treatments.

Crews from California-based firm Clean Waters Inc. were on the lake May 23 and May 24 to apply a herbicide known as DMA 4, using long hoses to send the chemical deep underwater where the targeted plants had taken root. The goal was to complete a large-scale application covering virtually the entire lake, but to do so without harming native plants or wildlife species.

Brenda Nordin, a lake biologist with the Department of Natural Resources, said she credited careful planning by all involved partners with executing the program and achieving the desired results. Nordin said the preliminary reports of 90 percent success or better was very impressive.

“That’s exactly what we like to hear,” she said.

Under state grant standards, a success rate of 75 percent is generally sufficient to judge a state-funded environmental program to be worthwhile.

In addition to the waterways management group, Zuelke said the lake cleanup effort has been supported, financially or otherwise, by local municipalities around the lake, county staff, area businesses and lakefront homeowners. The resulting improvement in water quality, he said, has impressed lake visitors and boosted prospects for increased tourism and economic activity.

“Everything’s very positive,” he said.

Heath said the small areas of Eurasian Water Milfoil that still exist — covering barely 1 percent of the lake — are somewhat concentrated on the lake’s western edge near Shawano Municipal Airport.

Consultants at De Pere-based Onterra will issue a formal report on the preliminary results within a few months. Then they plan to return to Shawano Lake next spring or summer to collect new water samples and look for signs of Eurasian Water Milfoil attempting a comeback.

Heath said nobody is certain yet whether the invasive plant has been eradicated or merely knocked down.

“If it comes back next year with a vengeance,” he said, “we’ll know the answer.”

ONLINE

For information about Shawano Area Waterways Management, go to www.sawm.org.

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Date set for hearing on sewer rate hike

Fri, 09/02/2016 - 7:18am
Utility seeks 12 percent increase in revenueBy: 

Tim Ryan, [email protected]

A date has been set for a public hearing via telephone on Shawano Sewer and Water Utility’s request for an increase in sewer rates.

The utility filed the application with the state Public Service Commission earlier this year.

According to city officials, the increase is necessary due to a 54 percent increase in utility infrastructure expenses and a 20 percent increase in operating expenses since the last full sewer rate case was completed in 2008.

The city has requested an overall increase in annual revenue of $219,140, or an increase of 12 percent over present revenue, though that percentage will vary depending on the type of customer.

According to City Administrator Brian Knapp, the current average sewer charge, based on the city average of 500 cubic feet of water used per month, is $30.37.

A 12 percent increase, if approved by the PSC, will raise the monthly sewer charge by $3.64 to $34.01.

However, Knapp noted, that will vary depending on classes of customers, which are broken into residential, commercial and industrial.

The PSC will determine the actual level of the revenue requirement after reviewing the application and holding the hearing.

If the commission authorizes an increase, it will also authorize the ultimate rates individual classes of customers pay.

The hearing is scheduled for 10 a.m. Sept. 16 in the River Room at Shawano City Hall, 125 S.Sawyer St.

Information regarding the application is also available on the PSCs website, http://psc.wi.gov.

Further questions can be addressed to Eddie Sheppard at 715-526-3512 during office hours, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Scheduling questions regarding the hearing may be directed to the Public Service Commission at 608-266-3768.

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Public Record

Fri, 09/02/2016 - 7:17am

Shawano Police Department

Aug. 31

Police logged 21 incidents, including the following:

Disorderly — A 22-year-old man was arrested for disorderly conduct after police responded to an intoxicated person complaint in the 200 block of East Center Street.

Burglary — A 55-year-old man was arrested for criminal trespass and bail jumping after police responded to a burglary complaint in the 300 block of South Washington Street.

Warrant — A 30-year-old man was taken into custody on a warrant at the probation and parole offices, 1340 E. Green Bay St.

Fraud — Police investigated a fraud complaint at Walmart, 1244 E. Green Bay St.

Shawano County Sheriff’s Department

Aug. 31

Deputies logged 53 incidents, including the following:

OWI — A 24-year-old Kaukauna man was arrested for operating while intoxicated on South High Line and state Highway 47 in the town of Lessor.

OWL/OAS — A 17-year-old Gillett male was cited for operating without a license and operating after suspension after an injury accident on Holy Hill Road in the town of Green Valley.

Vandalism — A truck was reported vandalized on Park Avenue in the town of Waukechon.

Warrant — A 29-year-old woman was arrested on an Oconto County warrant on Holy Hill Road in the town of Green Valley.

Vandalism — Playground equipment was reported damaged on Honeysuckle Lane in Tigerton.

Fraud — Authorities investigated a fraud complaint on Meisner Street in Wittenberg.

Theft — Tools were reported stolen on Main Street in Gresham.

Theft — An iPad was reported stolen on County Road N in the town of Birnamwood.

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Crow tests positive for West Nile

Fri, 09/02/2016 - 7:14am

The Shawano-Menominee Counties Health Department reports a dead crow found in Shawano on Aug. 18 has tested positive for West Nile virus. This is the first bird that tested positive for West Nile virus in Shawano County since surveillance for the mosquito-transmitted virus began May 1.

Several other counties in the state also have reported positive bird tests.

Shawano County has had a positive bird test for each of the last three years. The last positive test from Menominee County was in 2012.

“The positive bird means that residents of Shawano County need to be more vigilant in their personal protective measures to prevent mosquito bites,” said Jaime Bodden, county health officer.

West Nile virus is spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. Mosquitoes acquire the virus by feeding on infected birds.

“Shawano and Menominee counties residents should be aware of West Nile virus and take some simple steps to protect themselves and their families against mosquito bites,” Bodden said. “West Nile virus has been present in our area for several years, so the best way to avoid the disease is to reduce exposure to and eliminate breeding grounds for mosquitoes.”

Most people infected with West Nile virus do not get sick. Those who do become ill usually experience mild symptoms such as fever, headache, muscle ache, rash and fatigue. Less than 1 percent of people infected with the virus get seriously ill with symptoms that include high fever, muscle weakness, stiff neck, disorientation, mental confusion, tremors, confusion, paralysis and coma.

FYI

The Shawano-Menominee Counties Health Department recommends the following actions to eliminate breeding grounds for mosquitoes:

- Properly dispose of items that hold water, such as tin cans, plastic containers, ceramic pots or discarded tires.

- Clean roof gutters and downspouts for proper drainage.

- Turn over wheelbarrows, wading pools, boats, and canoes when not in use.

- Change the water in birdbaths and pet dishes at least every three days.

- Clean and chlorinate swimming pools, outdoor saunas, and hot tubs; drain water from pool covers.

- Trim tall grass, weeds, and vines since mosquitoes use these areas to rest during hot daylight hours.

- Landscape to prevent water from pooling in low-lying areas.

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